Example Of Ethical Relativism

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Ethical relativism is the belief that there are some moral beliefs that only hold to a society or individual while differing from a neighboring civilization or person. If one was to assume that ethical relativism was true, would moral progress be possible? Would the act of improving while perfect be possible? The answer is no.
The first process that must be done before diving into this question is defining the types of relativism. In the world of ethical relativism, there is a divide and bind between society and the individual. With society, the culture is what directs the morals for right and wrong. On the smaller scale, the individual’s morals are what guides him or her which can be separate from and even collide with the society’s moral standards. An example of cultural relativism would be the removal of limbs for getting caught stealing. In this case,
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Assuming that this relativism is true though, it would still be impossible for moral progress. The idea of moral progress is to become better as a person and or as a society, ethically speaking. An extreme instance of this would be if caught doing a petty crime instead of death, the punishment would be community service. This could be a measured moral progress by befitting society with free labor and the individual with keeping their life. This is all hypothetical assuming one is absolute, but if one is already perfect, is there room for improvement or expansion? As previously stated the answer is no. The only way there could be an enhancement or progress is if the culture or individual was not perfect to begin with. This idea counters the entire base of ethical relativism; if one follows their moral code then are morally right. To not follow one’s moral code for any reason, even improvement or change of heart, makes one morally wrong. On the personal scale, an individual’s morals and interest are

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