Examination Hell In Japan Essay

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Japan’s education system is often seen as a success internationally, as Japanese students tend to do significantly better than students in North America in the Math and Sciences. (Rohlen, 2001) The post-war occupation of schooling has provided Japan with the right tools to create economic success and social stability.(Rohlen, 2001) Japan’s education system follows a 6-3-3-4 system, where it is six years of primary school, three years of middle and high school, and four years of university. (Rohlen, 2001) Although Japan has created tremendous success in their students, unfavourable developments have arisen due to the pressure that are put on Japan’s students in order to succeed in school. Getting into a high ranking university, and graduating …show more content…
(Goya, 1993) In this paper, I will discuss the major flaw in Japan’s education system,“examination hell” which is referred to as shiken jigoku in Japanese, the negative effects examination hell has on students ', and the preparation involved in succeeding in these examinations. Entrance examinations, referred to as “examination hell” is a very important part of the education system in Japan, as these entrance examinations weigh heavily on the future of the students who take the exams. This competitive way of schooling puts tremendous pressures on the students in order to do well, and in some cases, the pressures can result negatively, causing cases of severe depression in the students. According to the article “Examination Hell” there have been “repeated complaints in the Japanese press that examination hell has prevented Japanese students from having a healthy childhood, has blunted intellectual curiosity, has discouraged females from applying to universities, …show more content…
(Okano, 1999) Cram schools (Juku) often specialize in a particular subject or subjects, with the intention of preparing students for high school and university entrance examinations. These schools offer after regular school hours, on weekends, and during school vacations. Certain cram schools are used to prepare students who have failed the previous entrance examination, which are called Ronin, and the students take the examinations the following year. (Cummings, 1997) The aim of cram schools is to impart as much information to its students in the least amount of time, to enable the students to pass, or obtain the required grade in the examination. There has been much criticism with these cram school, related to “examination hell” because students have been said to merely “parrot” the information, meaning they are simply repeating the information, without thought, and are said to lack the training of critical thinking and analysis. (Cummings, 1997) Cram schools, and supplemental tutoring in Japan has boomed into a vast commercial industry, where nearly 70 percent of Japanese students will experience going to an extracurricular school, by the time they leave middle school. (Cummings, 1997) This pattern of using supplementary tutoring continues while the students attend

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