Transnationalism In Mexico

1604 Words 7 Pages
Transnationalism is a broad topic which covers distinctive areas such as: political, economic, and cultural exchanges. As bordering countries, the United States and Mexico have comprehensive history of transnationalism. From economic policies, such as the Bracero Program to political policies such as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). But, what both economic and political policies share is the overwhelming influence that the United States had when determining these policies. Cultural exchanges happen on a micro level and manifest through music, movies, theater, news, and other forms of entertainment. Transnational cinema focuses on the films created by Mexican directors and the movie’s journey across political boarders. These …show more content…
President Porfirio Diaz, economic policies constructed large economic centers near the border. These centers increased investment and international trade between the United States and Mexico. These international trade policies largely benefited the elite Mexican class, but it also created an economic dependence with the United States. The Porfirian Regime ended with the 1910 Mexican Revolution. The revolution created a sentiment of anxiousness which led to foreign investors withdrawal from Mexico. As a direct result, Mexican immigration, to the United States increased. As the political issue of immigration grew it gained political and media coverage. Mexican filmmakers represent the history of emigrating to the United States as a life filled with opportunity but view America as corrupt. Unfortunately, the United States “media coverage and representation of the issues surrounding Mexican immigration have been greatly responsible for the current rise in xenophobia and anti-immigrant sentiment” (Maciel & Herrera, 149). Mexican films, about immigration, are portrayed by media outlets as threats to economic stability and a reason to securitize the …show more content…
Maciel & Maria H. Sobek, have characterize the distinctive cinematic film perspectives of immigration as either Hollywood, Mexican, or Chicano (152). Mexican filmmakers often drew inspiration from revolutionary political changes such as the Mexican Revolution. Mexican President Venustiano Carranza even encouraged filmmakers to presented this idea of nationalism and pride. The United States Hollywood films, viewed the violence of the revolution and presented stereotypical representations of Mexicans being “drunks, criminals, or bandits” (Stacy, 308). Ironically, American films, which presented the violent history of Mexico actually increased nationalist pride. This commonality of enduring suffering and resilience unified large groups of people and help construct the Mexican identity. The pride of being Mexican and not a Mexican-American even began to incorporate itself within movies. Director Emilio Fernandez 1942 Soy puro Mexicano film focused on the life of a Mexican bandit who combated red spies. The term “red spies” is used to described the Fascist party leaders Adolf Hitler, Hirohito, and Benito Mussolini. This incredibly melodramatic movie could be interpreted as a criticism of Mexican-American soldiers who have fought someone else’s war. The 1951 film, Aca las tortas, presents the life of an elderly couple who have worked to provide a better life for their children. As a result the children pursue a life in America two of the become westernized

Related Documents