Evolution Of College Basketball

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The NBA is a prominent renowned sport across the globe being televised by all shapes and sizes from our smartphone, TV, and computer. Due to it’s access and it’s popularity around the world, we can witness the Golden State Warriors orchestrate their playmaking ability to create an open shot. However, the basketball world wasn’t alike back in their heydays acquiring a meager amount of deals in order to televise their games. In addition, having only 17 teams during the birth of the NBA. But, due to the NBA’s progress from 1949 till today, it has demonstrated immense promises which significantly changed the game of basketball from different aspects towards the college players, major league, and internationally. In December of 1891, James Naismith …show more content…
Cinderella stories. Miracle buzzer-beater shots. These are the terms used in single-elimination matches in March Madness. College Basketball was perceived by James Naismith at Springfield College in 1891. It has become a memorable milestone for the game of basketball as it was first introduced to the public in 1901 as colleges began subsidizing games. At the beginning of College Basketball, very few teams were represented including Yale, Minnesota, Dartmouth, Columbia, Chicago, Utah, and Navy. During the fresh new stages of collegiate sports, the majority of the teams played less than 10 games while the fortunate ones were playing 15 or 16 games. Compared to today's standard with sixty-eight teams and sixty-seven games. In the year of 1901, Yale seize a record of 10 and 4 winning the first elusive National College Championship. However, there were controversies revolving around the the players health concerning with complications of their injuries and a scarcity of officials regulating the games. In order to settle the issue, the years between 1905-1910 many American advocates requested the government to establish restrictions on the sport. In 1910, President Theodore Roosevelt proposed the colleges to forge a governing body. Thus in the summer of 1910, they assembled the Intercollegiate Athletic Association. Along the way, during 1939, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) established a single-elimination tournament in order to determine the national …show more content…
However, it was an extensive dilemma for Spencer Haywood graduating from high school in 1967, at the moment when college freshmen were not allowed to play varsity sports for NCAA schools. After playing one year at Colorado Junior College, he went to play a season at the University of Detroit. Subsequently after the 1968-69 season, he placed his named at the ABA draft where there were no restrictions for underclassmen from entering the league. Thus having a lucrative rookie season with the Denver Rockets in addition, being named ABA’s Rookie of the Year and MVP. By the time he turned twenty-one, he signed a contract with the Seattle SuperSonics, which granted him a pavement to the NBA, due to having three years detached from his high school graduation. However, the NBA interrupted the contract reaching the U.S. Supreme Court, resulting with Haywood in favor of the decision of seven to two. After the settlement, the NBA have allowed players to leave college early. Thus opening the door for high schoolers to go into the draft. However, it lasted till 2005 when the Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) placed an age limit of 19 during the calendar year of the draft. Hence, producing the one-and-done players that played

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