American Culture In The 1920s

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During the 1920s, many events had taken place that have impacted American culture to this day. Some of these events include: the 1925 Scopes Trial, women’s suffrage and behavior, and the American film industry, too. The Scopes Trial brought about debates on evolution in schools, women’s rights are becoming more equal to those of men, and a revolution has begun in the American film industry. All of these events have had a lingering effect on how the American culture is today, and without them, things would probably be a lot different. Before the 1920s, most of the films created were based out of New york or New Jersey, and it was very rare for films to be shot anywhere else. Because of California’s warm year round weather and cheap land, …show more content…
This event was a court trial caused by a Tennessee teacher challenging the law, that governor Austin Peay had just passed, to ban the teaching of evolution in schools. This all started out with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) looking for a teacher that would challenge those laws. The man that had come forth was John T. Scopes, a high school teacher from Tennessee. It was April 23rd of 1925 when John Scopes had assigned the chapter on evolution, and he was convicted 12 days later on May 5, 1925. This trial has had a lingering effect on many things being taught today, and that is why it is …show more content…
Women in the 1920s had taken a dramatic jump from “traditional women” to the “new women.” These young women who had embraced in the new traditions were known as ‘flappers.’ Flappers were young, middle-class, women who basically had the intentions of having fun. They engaged in activities such as smoking, sex, and would often attend speakeasies to consume alcohol. Smoking, drinking, and sex were all results of women trying to destroy the idea that their behavior should be no different than a man’s. Another unusual activity that women had started to do was divorcement. The main reason that women had started to become this way in the 1920s was from their confidence boost after the Nineteenth Amendment was ratified; that amendment giving the women the right to vote. It was on August 26, 1920 when the right for women to vote was ratified, and also the date that changed everything for future women. Before of the suffragist who had worked their entire lives for these rights, women have a voice. Now that women have these rights, they can start to create their own opportunities, which is a large role in women’s lives today. These rights are the main reason why women in today’s world have become successful. So you can see how the 1920s for women were a vital part for them, it was the start of the new

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