Contradiction Between Evil And Evil

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Final Paper Many people would agree that there appears to be a contradiction between a loving God and the reality of evil. The attempt to answer these difficult contradictions is referred to as a theodicy. The great Christian thinker of our time, C. S. Lewis, wrote as an atheist after his beloved wife died, “meanwhile where is God? This is one of the most disquieting symptoms… But to go to Him when your need is desperate, when all other help is in vain, and what do you find? A door slammed in your face, and a sound of bolting and double bolting on the inside” (Velarde 1). Timothy Keller, pastor, and author of The Reason for God, believes that people have more problems concerning evil and suffering which for them, calls into question philosophically …show more content…
Evil and suffering extend to the moral world as well as the natural world. In the moral world, one only has to look at the history of humanity at its worst with tyrants who annihilated millions of their own people. In the last century, history records the evils of the Holocaust under Hitler and the horrors of the concentration camps. Millions were killed under Stalin and Moa Tse-Tung. Who can forget the discovery of Pol Pot’s killing fields in Cambodia? The world shuddered over the genocides in Rwanda and the mutilation that occurred (Strobel 27-28). In this century, the world’s eyes have been focused recently on Syria’s leader, Bashar Assad, who has used chemical weapons against his own people. All of recorded history is spotted with evil tyrants and the atrocities they committed either against their own people or other empires and …show more content…
But how can that be? Then morality is a product of one’s own mind. Harris admits that he cannot articulate his innate sense of the difference between right and wrong. That intuition toward morality could ever began from sheer matter and chemistry is totally illogical and defies reason. Zacharias states that when one claims that there is evil, then one can assume there is good. So therefore if one believes that there is good, then one must assume that there is a moral law by which one can tell the difference between good and evil. In order to be able to determine the difference between good and evil, there must be a standard. So when one, therefore assumes a moral law, there must be a moral lawgiver who is the source of the moral law. There must be a moral lawgiver to distinguish between good and evil because a moral affirmation cannot stay an abstraction. There is no intrinsic worth in a world that only matter exists. It is the person who moralizes that believes intrinsic value on himself, which then places that worth onto the life of someone else because that life is considered worthy of protection. Surpassing worth must come from a life of surpassing value (Zacharias

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