Peron In Argentina

Improved Essays
• The political background Argentina was expose contributed to the acceptance of Peron.
• According to Mark Falcoff and Ronald Dolkart ; “Previous government´s failure to effectively respond to the economic crisis in the country following World War II discredited former leaders, and created a demand for a strong leader to fill their place” (Falcoff & Dolkart, 1975).
• Other authors as Barager considers that the illegitimacy of previous governments influence the approval of Perón. “The answer to the question ‘Why Peron’ lies in the Argentine past and in the failure of previous governments to satisfy the needs and aspirations of the Argentine masses and of other groups dissatisfies with a status quo maintained by force and fraudulent elections
…show more content…
11)

Peron´s governmental policies

• During his first months as a President, Perón launched his First Five-Year Plan in which he seek to industrialize the country and create a stable middle class.
• According to Marshall (2014), “He implemented policies to protect workers, including the creation of paid vacations, and limitations on the hours in a working day. Under Perón, workers had more regulations to protect them than ever before, and also began to receive significantly higher wages” (pg. 14)
• From 1952 to 1955, Peron´s regime experienced a difficult time in which his regime was not able to maintain their sources of strength. For that reason, Perón attempted to keep in power by political authoritarianism (Goldwert, 1972).
• In order to preserve the power, Perón developed economic and domestic policies in order to benefit the worker. He intended to keep the support with populist
…show more content…
The new laws were based on economic nationalization and better working conditions.
• “His “New Deal” economic reforms were embodied in two sweeping five year plans, the first passed in 1946, and the second in 1952. Both rested on several core principles: enlarged state ownership through nationalization of utilities, central economic planning by the state, and industrialization” (Pahowka, 2005)
• “The declaration of a new constitution in March 1949 was the pinnacle of Perón's political power, based on a coalition of the workers, the military, women, and, surprisingly, some of the middle-class. The new constitution guaranteed the right to work, to earn a reasonable wage, good working conditions, human dignity, and well-being” (Gale, 2012).
• Eva Peron constitute an important image for Peronism. She lobbied for the institution of voting rights for women, something that she successfully achieved. She was consider to run with Juan Domingo for the presidency of Argentina, but the political opposition and her health affected the

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    Even though guerillas were losing more and more people to the Dirty War, this did not stop the military from continuing their pursuit of every potential subversive. As time went on, accusations of human rights violations began to pile up and the government quickly began to act as if they were in favor of human rights regulations. They tried to promote the welfare of the indigenous people of Argentina to fool the United Nations. At this point in the war, the military was battling a fake enemy, one created by them to deceive the rest of the world. After years of strife and unrest, the economy was again in terrible shape by the 80s.…

    • 1625 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Great Essays

    Intervention In Somalia

    • 1197 Words
    • 5 Pages

    In addition to the direct failures of the intervention, we can learn a great deal about the American failure through the consequences of Somalia. Domestic politics drives foreign policy, and in the case of Somalia, the domestic backlash sheds light on what was a step in the wrong direction for security as seen through Presidential Decision Directive 25. After the tragedy of the battle of Mogadishu and Black Hawk Down, President Clinton was facing mounting domestic pressure to ‘bring the boys home’. Congress was calling for a withdrawal of American troops, and the public were demanding an explanation for the lives lost in a battle many believed was outside the scope of U.S. interests. Another effect of globalisation was the increased media…

    • 1197 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    After looking at both sides, I believe that the treaty was responsible for World War II. the treaty highly offended Germany causing them to want revenge, the treaty diminished Germany 's economy, and the treaty affected Germany 's military. All of these points show how the Treaty was responsible for World War II, and how it failed in many different ways. Also, these atrocities made Germany very vulnerable, and lead to the rise in power of Adolf Hitler. On the contrary, although the Treaty failed in many ways, some people believe that it was not responsible for World War II, and that the worldwide depression was the main factor.The factors that were bad outweigh the factors that were good, and the treaty did more harm than…

    • 1707 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Conservatism Dbq

    • 900 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Friedman states that government intervention has made social and economic situations worse for Americans. But, all the recent successes of America are claimed to be attributed to the individualistic nature of the free-market economy. For this reason, Friedman proposes an already successful solution to the disappointing liberal actions of the American government to be more conservative. From a different end of the social hierarchy, a letter written to Nelson Rockefeller (Republican governor of New York) on February 6, 1971 (Doc 3) describes the negative effects of the government’s implications of “welfare cheats” and taxes. This “law-abiding citizen” uses her letter to request a necessary use of government intervention in fixing the damage in the poorer parts of New York.…

    • 900 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    More than five decades after the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act, many immigrants in the United States still follow the foundations of this immigration law. Also known as the Hart-Cellar Act, the legislation introduced a new age of mass immigration and impacted the lives of millions of new Americans. The fundamentals of this act are family reunification and employment preferences, which are still maintained in any reform efforts. The 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act replaced the National Origins System that privileged immigrants from northern and Western Europe, implemented in 1924 as the first United States comprehensive set of immigration regulations. (Boundless) Calls to reconsider the United States immigration policy rose with…

    • 1029 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Classical liberalist such as John Stuart Mill explained that the government should attempt to help the welfare of its people. Mill saw the problem with government and realized the change he wanted to see. Mill explain that because government is now responsible for people, the majority of society could use government to deny liberty to the minority or those who opposing views. This is a beneficial ideology to society because it will promote welfare to help people overcome obstacles. It is human nature to naturally be evil and we must have government to maintain and regulate society, in order to prevent citizens from trumping others rights.…

    • 1738 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies fought for the female vote through peaceful ways such as writing letters to Parliament and other committees (Gray, 1 & 2). This is similar to the way American women pushed their cause. American women, while working on other causes such as slavery and religion reform, grouped together to try to get women the right to vote in the United States. But, some British protest was somewhat violent as stated in the previous article. This is similar to American women in which some of them protested in violent ways as they saw this as means to stimulating their cause.…

    • 1386 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Mao's Communist Party

    • 947 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Under Mao, the slogan was to eliminate classes and to build an egalitarian society; since Deng, it has shifted to economic development to meet the population’s demand for higher material living conditions. The successful economic reforms so far have gained the regime significant approval from the population. Today, while keeping economic development as the priority, more policies are orientated to reduce social inequalities, to increase government’s accountability and to promote sustainable development. As a populist regime, it is necessary for the Party, maybe more than any democratic governments, to detect tensions in the society and to determine the needs of the population so as to be able to adapt its policies in time and to preserve its popularity, the very foundation of its…

    • 947 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The WNC developed the Women’s Charter, which laid out a plan of action for the movement. One of its main goals was to use the constitution to promote women’s equality in the constitution. The actions of women through the WNC led to the creation of the Gender Advisory Committee (GAC) for Convention for a Democratic South Africa (CODESA). However, women wanted to avoid having gender issues dismissed to just the GAC, so they successfully lobbied to have one member added to each negotiating council in South Africa, provided that the member could be a woman from the party. Some see this as the first major victory for women in post-apartheid South Africa (Britton “South Africa” 2006).…

    • 1487 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    When the Great Depression finally hit, the federal government decided to step in. “By 1940 its civilian payroll exceeded one million workers, and federal purchases of goods and services accounted for over 6 percent of the GNP” (Trescott). That is a big change from what it was before the depression. When Franklin Roosevelt took over office in March of 1933 much was going to change. Over the next few years, the government implemented the New Deal, a chain of experimental domestic programs that were supposed to stabilize the America and the economy (Trescott).…

    • 1273 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays