Euthanasi The Right To Die

1305 Words 6 Pages
If people have the right to live, do we also have the right to die? This question is what brought controversy to the situation concerning mercy killing. Today, mercy killing, properly known as euthanasia, is a term used when terminally ill patients request to be killed by doctors. Some countries contain laws regulating euthanasia, while other countries keep a neutral stance on the issue. However, people against the legalization of mercy killing fear for the possible consequences brought from it. People supporting euthanasia strongly believe in the “right to die” and our personal decisions of our lives. Despite their rights, mercy killing has many consequences that not only affect the patient, but anyone involved with the patient. As a result, …show more content…
Laws in other foreign countries tend to specify the patients right to choose whether they want to live or die. However, this law disregards relatives or anyone close to the patient, which may react negatively to the patient’s decision on ending their life. For example, in the case involving Terri Schiavo, a woman suffering in a coma, her husband decided to remove her feeding tube without the consent of her parents. As a result, her parents fought a battle to keep her alive, which unfortunately lost, and witnessed the death of their daughter two weeks after the tube was removed (“Pros and Cons of Mercy Killing”). Despite the husband’s decision to end his wife’s suffering, he neglected her parents which eventually caused uproar for the life of Terri. One person shouldn’t decide on their fate alone, and should at least care enough to let those around them know about their decision. As quoted from Dr. Peter Saunders, a New Zealander who wrote an article on euthanasia, “no man is an island, No person makes the decision to end his or her life in isolation.” Saunders continues, stating that today we glorify someone’s decision of death, but forget the pain, guilt, or bitterness we may leave on the lives of others. While it may be the person’s right to choose, the people around us are just as important in the decision process. Aside from the patient, however, there have been …show more content…
I reality, this abuse occurs around the world, but studies show that it occurs in countries where euthanasia is legalized. In the case of the Netherland, which legalized euthanasia in 1973, attorney Anne McTavish interviewed doctors on the issue. In 1990, out of the 130,000 people who were reported to have died by assisted suicide, “2,300 asked doctors to kill them, 400 asked doctors to provide means to kill them, 8,100 died when doctors gave them an overdose of pain medication to kill them (4,941 of these patients didn’t consent), and 1,040 people died when doctors euthanized them without their knowledge or consent.” Moreover, those same doctors later admitted them “under-reported euthanasia cases, so the statistics are actually less than what really happened” (Anne McTavish). The amount of patients killed without their consent along with the unknown amount of no reported cases is a prime example as to how euthanasia can be abused despite all the laws and restrictions on the practice. Holland’s experience with euthanasia was no different. In a recent government investigation, in 1990, “1,030 Dutch patients were killed without their consent. Out of 22,500 deaths due to withdrawal of life support, 63% were denied medical treatment without their consent. Twelve percent were mentally incompetent” (“If Mercy Killing Becomes Legal”). Involuntary euthanasia rises from the legalization of the

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