Ethos Pathos In Propaganda

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Propaganda is a form of large-scale persuasion that has been implemented in all civilizations throughout history. Many believe that propaganda was only used in totalitarian states, such as Nazi Germany in the 1930s and 1940s; however, this is not at all the case. Propaganda dates back to the first recorded civilization, ancient Mesopotamia, in the 18th century BCE, and is still widely used in societies today, including the United States. Propaganda is defined as “biased or misleading information that is used to promote or publicize a particular political cause or point of view” (Google Dictionary). Propaganda may be truthful or dishonest. Propaganda uses persuasion techniques including pathos, ethos, and logos. Pathos appeals to an audience’s …show more content…
Logos appeals to logic, using specific facts to prove a point. Propaganda documents reveal the values and the lifestyle of the authors and their audiences. Often, the very powerful and upper-class citizens of a society maintain control over propaganda, which allows them to perpetuate their power. Propaganda leads to consensus among a society rather than allowing a diversity of ideas to flourish in a society. In this way, propaganda is central to establishing and perpetuating a culture. Propaganda is such a powerful tool that can control the thoughts and behaviors of a whole society. Propaganda can determine whether a society experiences political stability and unity or political revolution and chaos. Those who are skilled rhetoricians hold great power to sway others’ opinions. The powerful often fear skilled rhetoricians and try to suppress their voices so that they can maintain undiminished power over the masses. Throughout the course of history, propaganda has been a powerful method to control people’s thoughts and …show more content…
The Mesopotamians valued social and political order. They believed in rewarding appropriate behavior and punishing inappropriate behavior. According to Hammurabi, the code “established law and justice in the land” (Code of Hammurabi, MyHistoryLab, P. 36). The code also reveals that Mesopotamians were concerned with living a good life on earth rather than achieving an afterlife. The ultimate reward for obeying the laws was that “Shamash prolong [a] man’s reign” (Code of Hammurabi, MyHistoryLab, P. 39). The Code of Hammurabi “prescribed different rights, responsibilities, and punishments, depending on gender, class, and whether a person was enslaved or free” (Craig, P. 11). Women and slaves in ancient Mesopotamia were treated as second-class citizens. For example, the code states that “if the finger have been pointed at the wife of a man because of another man, and she have not been taken in lying with another man, for her husband’s sake she shall throw herself into the river” (Code of Hammurabi, MyHistoryLab, P. 38). This shows that the Mesopotamians believed that men’s reputations were more important than women’s lives. Another example of the code’s unequal treatment of citizens is the law that “if a man’s slave strike a man’s son, they shall cut off his ear” (Code of Hammurabi, MyHistoryLab, P. 39). This shows that the Mesopotamians did not believe that a slave had the same human

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