Ethos And Pathos In Professionss For Women By Virginia Woolf

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To walk down a bustling city street in the 1940’s, one might catch a glimpse of the tight, bouncing curls adorning the heads of the fair women strutting down the sidewalk. The eye catching emeralds and olives of women 's dresses flow loosely in the breeze. Demanding the attention of all who pass by are the rosy cheeks, plush lips, and radiant eyes of the upscale women seemingly all around. So many pretty faces one might see on the city street. But, that is all women were; they were pretty faces in pretty dresses. The 1940’s yielded many beautiful women; yet most had a passionate desire to be acknowledge for more. A prominent feminist of the time named Virginia Woolf promoted the idea that women should be valued for their intellect as …show more content…
In her essay, “Professions for Women,” she effectively uses ethos and pathos to persuade society that though women have equal opportunity in the professional world, they face several more obstacles …show more content…
Prominently displaying this is the writing phantom she titles, “The Angel in the House,” that works to connect with the audience through emotional understanding. Woolf immediately begins to describe her negative encounters with the angel by recalling, “It was she who used to come between me and my paper when I was writing reviews. It was she who bothered me and wasted my time and so tormented me that at last I killed her.”9 By using various negative diction such as, “bothered,” “tormented,” and, “killed,” Woolf creates a contemptuous feeling in her audience towards the phantom. As the phantom is symbolic for obstacles of women in the work place, Woolf’s audience, though they may not know it, harbors feelings of contempt towards the inequality of the obstacles only women face in the first place. These feelings prove Woolf’s argument is effective because her clever manipulation of words has manipulated the audience to feel positively towards Woolf’s viewpoint and negatively towards opposing viewpoints. Thus, they will follow Woolf’s example and support her values of gender equality. Along with this, the quote above also displays Woolf’s use of the emotion trust to create effectiveness in her argument. The first half of the phrase, “It was she who used to come between me and my paper,” is a rather revealing clause. It can be seen as a symbolic

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