Ethnocentrism Or Cultural Relativism

Great Essays
1.) Do you favor ethnocentrism or cultural relativism? Define both, using examples, and explain your position.
Ethnocentrism is a concept developed by William Sumner in 1906. Ethnocentrism is when a “group” uses there way of doing things to judge others. There are positives and negatives to ethnocentrism. On the positive side of ethnocentrism, it creates loyalties with a group. While on the negative side ethnocentrism can lead to discrimination.
Cultural relativism is a way to look at a cultural without using one group’s way to judge them. With cultural relativism one would look at how the entire culture fits together again without using one’s own group views as superior. With cultural relativism, a lot of cultures have their own views, morals
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Discuss the reasons Kingsley Davis and Wilbert Moore concluded that stratification is inevitable.
The Davis-Moore view on social stratification argues that social inequality is necessary to fulfill vital system needs. They first discussed their theory of stratification in 1945, in an article called “Some Principles of Stratification.” Davis and Moore claim that no society is unstratified therefor inequality has to be universal. Davis and Moore say inequality benefits society.
Davis and Moore ask, why are some positions in society higher than others and why higher positions carry more status and rewards than others. Here is the answers they came up with: Societies are stratified because you have to have inequality for the social system to work, Society needs the members to be distributed in various positions, Members of the society need to be motivated to fill positions and the duties with it, The positions are through unequal distribution of rewards, Not all positions are equally important or equal in talent and
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List and explain the three main theoretical perspectives in sociology.
The first of the three main theoretical theories is the Functionalist Perspective. The Functionalist Perspective is based on works from Herbert Spencer, Emile Durkheim, Talcott Parsons, and Robert Merton. Functionalism says, that society works as interconnected parts to create harmony and maintain a state of balance and social equilibrium as a whole. Functionalist focuses on the interconnectedness of society by focusing on how each part is influenced and how each part influences the other parts.
Functionalists will use terms such as functional and dysfunctional to describes elements of society. Functionalists say that a society is functional if the elements contribute to the stability of society, while on the other hand if it disrupts the stability of society then the elements will be considered dysfunctional. There are two “subsections” of functionalist coined by Merton, they are manifest and latent. Manifest functions are commonly recognized and are intended consequences. For example, “the manifest function of education is to transmit knowledge and skills to society’s youth.” (https://laulima.hawaii.edu/access/content/user/kfrench/sociology/the%20three%20main%20sociological%20perspectives.pdf) While “public elementary schools also serve as babysitters for employed parents, and colleges offer a place for young adults to meet potential mates. The baby-sitting and mate-selectin functions are not intended

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