Essay On Ethical Relativism

Improved Essays
Ethical relativism is the theory that morality is relative to the normal practices of one's culture. Whether an action is right or wrong, depends on the moral norms of the society in which it is practiced. One action may be morally right in one society but, be morally wrong in another. Ethical relativists believe there are no universal moral standards. One society cannot judge another society. Moral standards can only be judged within a society. Many people do not agree with ethical relativism because there should be some sort of baseline that we can judge a person’s morals. Of course, there will always be practices that differ from society to society. The way people dress, religious beliefs, education beliefs, etc., can differ from each society. But, things like murder, torture, child abuse, should all be …show more content…
Absolutism is the belief that something is either right, or wrong, and there is no difference based on the society you belong to. One theory is on one side of the spectrum, and the other is way at the other end. Personally, I can’t say I agree solely with either. I am somewhere in the middle. As I’m thinking about the two, I thought about something that was common practice for my family. I was raised in a family with a Portuguese background. I am the 1st American born child on both my maternal and paternal side. When I was a child, all of my aunts, uncles, and cousins, would visit my grandparent’s house on Sunday, after church. All of us cousins would sit around while my grandfather, who raised different animals, killed rabbits to cook for dinner. I look back on that and just shrug it off. When I met my husband and that story came up, he looked horrified. To me, that was normal. Every Portuguese person I know can tell you a similar story. That was our culture. My husband, on the other hand, thinks that is some sort of traumatizing

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    It involves assessing what the people perceive to be moral and taking actions which will produce insignificant consequences on the people other than the individual performing the act. REGARDING EITHER THEORIST 6. As provided by Kant on his ethical theory, the standard of living an ethical life entails carrying out the logical reasoning behind the actions which are perceived to be moral. Kant argued that it is not a matter of following what the norm have stated to be moral but rather questioning the reason behind taking certain actions (Ross 37). Mill on the other hand in his utilitarian ethical theory based standards of living an ethical life on the ability of one to achieve maximum happiness from the…

    • 1177 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Ethical relativism is the belief that there are some moral beliefs that only hold to a society or individual while differing from a neighboring civilization or person. If one was to assume that ethical relativism was true, would moral progress be possible? Would the act of improving while perfect be possible? The answer is no. The first process that must be done before diving into this question is defining the types of relativism.…

    • 872 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Kantian Ethical Theory

    • 756 Words
    • 4 Pages

    In my understanding, it is true that ethics of what is right or wrong varies depending on an individual’s upbringing, and therefore, there are no moral absolutes, but morals are dependent on social norms. The strengths of this philosophy are that it is a practical moral philosophy which has respect for societies hence embracing peace and harmony. The problems with ethical relativism are that it fails to embrace universal moral values as they sometimes conflict because cultures are diverse and differ from society to society. Virtual ethics is character based rather than action person, and, therefore, it focuses on the moral character of an individual executing an action and overlooks on the rules, duties and consequences of that specific action (Wolff 170). The three best examples of feminist critiques of the ethical theory include, first that the theories focus solely on men’s perspective, secondly, women are depicted as being ethically immature hence don’t play many roles in defining morality.…

    • 756 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The idea of each person ought to pursue his or her own self -interest exclusively to do in his life time for others is known as Ethical Egoism. In other words, ethical egoism states that (i) There are objective moral facts and (ii) An action is morally good if and only if it promotes my personal happiness and it is morally wrong if and only if that action hinders…

    • 737 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Everyone has a different set of morals that are unique and different from others. Morality can’t be enforced by law. It should be up to the individual what is right and wrong. People will do what they want to do, no matter if their government enforces laws against their desired actions. Everyone has different views on what is right and wrong.…

    • 1831 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Divine Command Theory

    • 840 Words
    • 4 Pages

    This view states that “moral standards are relative to cultures or societies.” (Shafer-Landau, 293) I like this view because I believe that people should be able to live their lives according to their own moral standards. Cultural groups and societies should be able to dictate what is good and what is bad on their own. A moral code should not have to be validated by a god, people can be the authors of morality. The views of Cultural Relativism are very similar to sovereignty. Living in a world filled with many cultures it would be impossible to create one uniform moral code that could be accepted by everyone.…

    • 840 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    She describes morality as something that is wholly individual to cultures, and which cannot be criticized by members of other cultures. Pojman does not agree with Benedict’s views of morality. He claims that if morality is relative then it may as well be made up (p.165). Because their beliefs…

    • 745 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    According to moral relativism, or ethical relativism, all views, no matter if they vary across cultures or people, are equally valid and no single belief is absolute, but is satisfactory to the moral standards of a person or group of people. These beliefs are stemmed from ones’ environment or preference. Just because something may be right for you, doesn’t necessarily mean that it is right for everyone else. Ethical relativism is linked to normative subjectivism, which describes the state under which a certain action may be considered right or wrong. This means that the action of another can be considered right if the person pursuing that action believes so.…

    • 1666 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    To achieve a just society we have to reason together about the meaning of the good life, and to create a public culture, hospitable to the disagreements that will inevitably arise.” (Sandel pg. 261) An argument of maximizing utility and welfare or simply respecting the freedom of choice from the utilitarian or libertarian view is an argument that does not address their shortcomings. “Justice is not only about the right way to distribute things. It is also about the right way to value things.” (Sandel pg. 261) Equality and liberty are something that we see as the same things.…

    • 1287 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In the sense that, the same challenges faced by ethical subjectivism would be similar to the ones faced by cultural relativism. This is because ethical subjectivism is an extension of cultural relativism (Gensler, 2011). Nevertheless, both theories seem to differ in terms of the number of people that are involved in the decision-making process of what is morally right or wrong. For example, in ethical subjectivism it is only the individual alone who decides. However, in cultural relativism it is normally all the members of that certain culture who decides on what is morally acceptable.…

    • 1037 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays