Ethical Issues On Malaria

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Malaria is one of the most widespread, serious, and dangerous illnesses that affect a huge population, especially in the Sub Saharan Africa region. [1] Malaria causes more than 250 million infections and nearly 1 million deaths annually, with 90% of fatal cases occurring in infants and children, typically in sub-Saharan Africa. Considering the high percentage of infected people, interventions towards preventing malaria need to occur. Genetically modified mosquitoes are one way to prevent malaria. However, as global citizens we need to think about the ethical challenges to choosing genetically modified mosquitoes as a way to eliminate malaria, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa. This paper will discuss multiple ethical challenges that genetically …show more content…
In other words, the equality and inequality of intervention access for different developing countries. If the intervention will not be available for all and affordable, then we did not solve the disease problem. Due to the inequality between the distribution of and access to different interventions, we need to make sure we put into consideration egalitarian theory as one of the main ethical challenges to prevent malaria. Last but not least, informed consent is another important ethical challenge to prevent malaria. Informed consent is important so we can understand and put into consideration people’s different beliefs and cultures. Moreover, [2] it is necessary to make early attempts to build up of knowledge regarding the community and its diverse characteristics and needs before taking actions. In conclusion, malaria is a serious disease and there are a variety of ethical issues that occur in response to the use of genetically modified mosquitoes. Ethically, we should identify the core values and beliefs of people in order to help in guidelines to do the necessary research needed for diseases prevention. We must have a balanced guideline to cover most of the ethical challenges to protect our environment for future

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