Ethical Implications Of Genetically Modified Food

1447 Words 6 Pages
As human technological improvement progresses into the present-day, the public is confronted with difficult issues. Genetic modification and cloning are both notable examples of technological issues that have considerable moral and ethical implications. Genetic modification is a stirring subject, and genetically modified organisms in particular, has widespread potential to develop modern day agriculture. To move towards a sustainable future in food production there should be the widespread acceptance of genetically modified organisms, and eventually increase the use of GMO’s as an option for food production. Genetically modified organisms creates a sustainable way to feed the world, increase crop yields and creates more efficient use of land, …show more content…
Which typically uses the process known as artificial selection or selective breeding. This process essentially creates a sustainable way to feed the world. A few of the most exciting developments towards genetically improved plants are aimed at non-food sources. For instance, the genetic engineering of plants has the ability to provide edible plant vaccines that can be used to vaccinate people against an assortment of infectious diseases, varying from cholera to possibly AIDS (“Benefits of GM Food,” …show more content…
Some GMO foods have been altered to make them less susceptible to insect pests. The University of California in San Diego states that a lethal bacterium can be inserted to crops to make them insect repellent, but safe for human use (“Pros & Cons,” 2014). This can decrease the amount of pesticide chemicals consumed on plants, so theoretically cutting exposure to pesticides. A popular example would be corn, the most important and widely grown grain in the United States. Unfortunately, corn is not able to breed without human aid, and is susceptible to many pests and needs a lot of nutrients. GMO corn of many sorts has been bioengineered to comprise genes derived from other plants in order to create better quality corn, resist pests, and produce superior yields and to flourish within a abundance of environmental circumstances. On a similar note, genetic modification can also imply a simple plant breeding and cross-pollination of ordinary corn plants to combine promising features. Corn was first domesticated in Mexico 10, 000 years ago by cross-pollination, transforming teosinte, and a nondescript gene, into full-eared, contemporary corn. Fundamentally, the benefits of the initial GMO species have remained developing for 10 millennia. Mankind has been manipulating the genetics of crops for around 10, 000 years (“Pros & Cons,” 2014). Wheat,

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