Ethical Egoism: The Self-Reliance Profunt And The Liberttarian Argument

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According to Russ Shafer-landau: “ethical egoism is a moral theory.it tell us about what we are morally required and forbidden to do. Specifically, it say that there is one ultimate moral duty-to improve your own well- being as best you can. Whenever you fail to achieve this goal, you are behaving immorally”. (106, par2). This statement enclosed the justification and the base of the ethical egoism theory, therefore the pursuit of the well- being is the main purpose. Ethical egoism is a controversial moral theory, because it says that we should embrace the self- interest idea. That is whatever we do we should do in the pursuit of our own interest it does not matter if in the process of doing it we harm others. If we fail to do as the …show more content…
This theory have two main arguments the Self- Reliance Argument and the Libertarian Argument. The first one claims that “everybody must mind their own business, take the better path to make everyone better off, and ought to mind their own business and tend only to their own needs” (110, par 4). The first argument is confusing this a egoist theory that is asking to take a better path to make everyone better off while it is also asking to mind our own business, therefore it contradicts itself. If someone is minding their own business it let no window to consider someone else well-being. The Libertarian argument says that we should help someone in reparation or consent. Which means that if in some point we hurt somebody we must help that person to repair the damage, also if we consent that help that, is if we agree to help. What if someone ask for help? To go …show more content…
Why people sacrifice with no self-interest? Why people still want to help each other without waiting a pay back? Because besides our differences there is still humanity on us, and what we consider to be moral for the majority differs a lot for what is moral for ethical egoist. For most humans is difficult if not impossible to turn our heads if we see somebody drowning. Is still repelling watch wrong and stood there like nothing is happen. We experience amazing examples of people that fight for our commons rights or the ones that fight to help our planet, like the green peace movement. They are doing this for a generalized well-being. Although Ethical theory differs a lot from our core values and moral beliefs it also teach something important, and that is work to improve ourselves. To help others we have to be in good shape in every aspect or at least in the area that we are going to help. For example, to borrow money we should have enough for us and some extra to give

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