Ethical Dilemmas: The Benefits Of Eugenics?

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As genetic and reproductive technologies advance, ethical concerns also continue to grow. Eugenics means “well-born”, and it is a movement whose purpose is to improve the genetic composition of the human race. The eugenics movement began in the U.S. in the late 19th century and was focused on stopping the transmission of negative or undesirable traits from one generation to the next. This was accomplished back then through sterilization of unfit individuals to prevent them from passing on their negative traits to future generations. Today there are technologies that make it possible to alter the genetic composition of an individual more directly through the use of genetic testing to eradicate certain diseases. The ethical dilemma is on …show more content…
A child that has a genetic disease could put an enormous strain on the family and also on the society that the child lives in. Eugenics can give parents the assurance that their children will not have any genetic disorders since only the embryos that are genetically normal are placed into the mother’s uterus. Eugenics can also be used by parents to select the gender of their offspring to avoid sex-linked disorders.
Eugenics can also benefit families who have a sick child who requires a stem cell transplant. They can utilize eugenics to match an embryo to the sick child’s tissues and after that child is born, they can use the stem cells from the umbilical cord to transplant them into their sick child.
Kantian Analysis The main purpose of eugenics is to test embryos for genetic abnormalities and discard those embryos that are flawed. How can we as a society value our members if we are getting rid of those that are flawed? Eugenics takes away the human value and dignity of each and every
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Eugenics cannot be used in every situation, so Kant would disagree with eugenics. With eugenics, we are devaluing human life. We are saying that the disabled or people with genetic defects have no value and should be discarded. The goal of eugenics is to get rid of genetic diseases but the means to get to that point is morally and ethically wrong.
My Personal View Based on Kant’s ethical theory, I am against using eugenics. Eugenics cheapens human life and makes children a product to fit with what our own personal desires are based on our own preference. With eugenics, we as a society are playing God. It is not morally or ethically right to manipulate babies into the perfect baby or to get rid of those with genetic defects for the benefit of society. We are trying to better the human race, but we are actually doing more harm than good. Human value begins at conception and discarding an embryo, even if flawed, is the same as getting rid of a human life. Eugenics raises many complex and ethical issues. Although eugenics can offer the possibility of reducing genetic diseases and in some way bettering society, it goes against Kant’s ethical theory on multiple

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