Ethical Issues In Ww2

1486 Words 6 Pages
September 1, 1939, as Hitler’s power grows, Germany invades Poland, kicking off what will later be known as World War II. Within days, a number of other countries had joined in, turning out to be the largest conflict in history. The countries that opposed each other were known as the Axis and Allied powers. Though United States was neutral at the beginning, during the war, accumulated a few allies. The United Kingdom, being a small island nation, was one of them and very dependent on The American aid of importing guns, ammo, and other necessities. The fact that the U.S. sent military aid to the United Kingdom was viewed as a hostile act according to Hitler, so Germany began to attack U.S. supply ships with their famous U-boats, as well as airplanes, …show more content…
Contrary to what others think, the most ethical action did take place on those two devastating days in Japan. By the time August came around, the war had been intensifying. The war was draining funds from every country involved so there was a need to end the war quickly. The Japanese military was strong and powerful in many ways but most importantly, they rarely ever gave up, after 2 atomic bombings, a bunch of what is called conventional bomb droppings, and an on-foot invasion by the Soviet Union, the Japanese government still refused to surrender, causing the final attack. In the 1930s, the Japanese economy suffered less from the Great Depression as the U.S. did. In fact, Japan increased population at the rapid rate of 5 percent of GDP per year. During the war, the American economy was flourishing and the war created a rapid increase in scientific and technological changes. Psychologists in Hiroshima and Nagasaki also reported increased complaints among survivors of neurotic symptoms, including general fatigue, amnesia, lack of concentration, as well as PTSD. A few days later, since this resulted in Japan surrendering and World War II ending, the United States could say in confidence that dropping the atomic bomb resulted in efficiently and effectively ending …show more content…
“During the war 17 million new civilian jobs were created while industrial productivity increased by 96 percent.” War needed equipment consumed over one-third of the output of industry. The war also created entirely new technologies industries. So although this dramatic experience killed many people, the later results for Japan were drastically improved. The ethical dilemma is if this was a good idea or not. The saying “all is fair in love and war” comes to play in this instance. Our military had a problem to fix in order to do their duty by protecting American soil and they managed to fix it the best way they knew how, given certain conditions and complications. Unfortunately the Hiroshima explosion wiped out about 90 percent of the city, killing 80,000 people instantly and tens of thousands later died of radiation exposure, but it could have been a lot worse for both sides. There was a time for them to surrender without any consequences when the U.S. proposed the Potsdam Declaration, which threatened the Japanese with “prompt and utter destruction” if they refused and of course Japan denied. In return, we blew their world up. Decades later, people are still debating the morals of Truman by ordering the bomb on Japan. The unfortunate loss of over 200,000 civilians is tragic, but war is never a pretty sight. Looking

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