Ethical Dilemma Of Organ Donation

1007 Words 5 Pages
In 2011, approximately 2.5 million Americans died (Hoyert & Xu 2). Some of those people were fortunate to live a long and heathy life while for others, their lives were physically painful and tragically short. We cannot choose how well or how long we will live - that is outside our control. This is especially true for the more than 123,000 people who are currently on organ transplant lists (Facts and Myths). Although we will all die, people awaiting transplants know that without a replacement their lives will be shorter than if they had healthy organs. It is tragic that nearly sixty percent of those on wait lists will pass before a transplant becomes available despite the large number of potential organs existing as a result of the natural …show more content…
Reverse onus places the responsibility of determining a choice one way or the other concerning organ donation in the hands of the individual and does not “presume” to consent for anyone. Thus, this is not taking the choice away from anyone. It would simply compel people into indicating their decision ahead of time if they felt strongly enough about not donating, knowing that by refraining from making a choice the decision would default towards organ donation. This takes the moral and ethical dilemma that families face at the time of a loved one’s death out of their hands. It would alleviate any guilt felt by the family in having to make a choice at a time when they are grieving for their loved one’s death. Unless people clearly and openly refuse to donate, organ donation should be …show more content…
A total of 123,000 people a year does not seem like a numerically significant number in a country of 300 million; however, for those who are awaiting transplants, it is momentous. Although the phrase – you cannot take it with you – usually refers to material wealth, it can also apply to organs. Reverse-onus organ donations is not only a worthy and sustainable option for a modern society, it demonstrates an elevated level of compassion for those in need by those who no longer have a

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