Ethical Classifications Of Euthanasia

1516 Words 7 Pages
Euthanasia, also known as assisted suicide, physician-assisted suicide (dying), and doctor-assisted dying (suicide), and more loosely termed mercy killing, means to take a deliberate action with the express intention of ending a life to relieve intractable (persistent, unstoppable) suffering. There are two main classifications of euthanasia, Voluntary and Involuntary euthanasia. Voluntary euthanasia- this is euthanasia conducted with consent. Involuntary euthanasia- this is euthanasia without consent. There are two procedural classifications of euthanasia, Passive euthanasia- this when life-sustaining treatments are withheld. Active euthanasia- lethal substances or forces are used to end the patient’s life. The history of Euthanasia began …show more content…
The 1970s showed an expansion of the nursing fields, allowing more specialties as well as the need for nurses in Vietnam. The 1980s also experienced a shortage of nurses as the new HIV-AIDS- related care was brought to light. From the 1990s and into the future, the need for nurses is greater than ever as health care reform continues in Congress and in the lives of the older generation. (Nursing). The 20th century also paved the way for a larger and more expanded role for nurses, introducing a number of distinct areas in which nurses could specialize in, including such specialty care as orthopedics, trauma, critical care, pediatrics and neonatal nursing. Throughout the years leading up to the current day, nursing also saw a shift away from the typical description of a doctor’s assistant to performing many of these duties themselves, including everything from performing procedures to prescribing medication. In fact, in today’s industry, nurses can choose to receive training in well over 200 unique healthcare specialties. (Nate Sayles) More than two decades later, however, International Council of Nurses (ICN), succeeded in establishing International Nurses Day on the anniversary of Florence Nightingale, a 19th century wartime nurse considered the founder of modern …show more content…
Concerned with the principles of right and wrong behavior and the goodness or badness of human character. (Moral). The moral argument of euthanasia is most of the opposing religious views hold that only God has the right to give or take a life, other religious including the Anglican, Methodist, and Unitarian movements take a more liberal view of euthanasia. Other religions such as Buddhism, Sikhism, and Hinduism prohibit the voluntary murder but are less distinct about euthanasia. Jainism glorifies voluntary suicide by fasting. Several religious cults, however, endorse the practice of writing a living will. (Euthanasia). Opponents of euthanasia contend that there is no guarantee that euthanasia will be strictly voluntary, but Islam and Judaism are staunchly opposed to any form of euthanasia, assisted dying, or suicide. Most opposing religious view hold that only God has the right to take a life (J, Pereira). These statements are contradictory because some opponents of assisted-physician suicide argue that permitting some assisted suicides may lead to the killing of patients who want to live. (Garn LeBaron). In response to the opponent’s argument voluntary euthanasia must be well-considered, informed and persistent over time. As a result, euthanasia is not moral. Another major point of argument is whether euthanasia is constitutional. A body of fundamental principles or established precedents per which a state or other

Related Documents