Essential Features Of Gender Feminism

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Register to read the introduction… Contemporary feminism, says Sommers, has more to do with revelation than with …show more content…
Such women, in their view, have been “socialized” into accepting their oppression and need to have their “consciousness raised” to understand the need for revolutionary change. Sommers writes: “Here, the gender feminist—like other radical social philosophers—shows her small-minded colors. Where the liberal attends to the actual professed aspirations of those she wants to help, the radical is impatient with them. The goal of restructuring human beings and human society by changing what the average person professedly wants in favor of what he or she ‘ought to want' is an essential feature of gender feminism. In this fundamental respect, gender feminism is crudely intolerant and …show more content…
Women who insist upon following the patterns of “craven femininity” should simply be forced to change their ways. De Beauvoir wrote: “No woman should be authorized to stay at home and raise her children. . . . One should not have the choice precisely because if there is such a choice, too many women will make that one.” Thus does the gender feminist set herself up as a Philosopher Queen to make sure that people choose what is “good for them.” Sommers observes: “Radical philosophers characteristically believe themselves to have a clear perception of the ‘objective interests' of the people they want to help. Where liberal reformers are dependent on finding out about the ideals and preferences of those they help, radicals come to the task of social reform already equipped with a principled knowledge of what their constituents ‘really' want and need. The values of the uninitiated are ‘subjective' and must be discounted when they conflict with the genderless ideal. (Radical philosophers are not good at seeing themselves in ironical perspective. The irony of egalitarian elite would not have been lost on Hegel.)” But a reasonable moral theory aims generally at saving appearances and making sense of them, and not at a wholesale dismissal of established morality as an illusion. And good social criticism

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