Essay On Zoroastrianism

Improved Essays
Zoroastrianism is a religion that influenced the development of Christianity and Manichaeism. It believes in the role of individuals determining their own fate and emphasizes the duality of good and evil. Early Aryan influences on Persian religious traditions. Zarathustra (late 7th-early 6th centuries BCE) is the founder of Zoroastrianism. He believes that Ahura Mazda had chosen him to be a prophet. In the sixth century BCE, Zoroastrianism attracted Persian aristocrats and ruling elites. It also influenced Judaism, Christianity and later, Islam. When Alexander of Macedonia defeated Darius III in battle, Alexander conquered most of the Persian territories. This caused Zoroastrianism to receive a huge blow since many priests were killed and …show more content…
The main beliefs of Confucianism are social harmony, created by the moral example of superiors, and humanism according to Li (ritual norms), Zhou (loyalty to one’s true nature), Shu (reciprocity), and Xiao (filial piety). Confucius believed that society consists of unequal relationships, so if the superiors in society behave with sincerity, courtesy, and are respectful, the inferiors will be submissively motivated to do also. Confucianism not only gave more social mobility within classes but also gave more rights for women. However, these new Confucian rights were not given for women to gain independence such as the right for higher education but for them to serve the men better, maintaining a patriarchal society. Instead of using the previous harsher and cruel laws and regulation against the civilians. The Han rulers modified some of the harsher aspects of the Zhao dynasty; Confucian ideals of government, out of favor during the Qin period, were adopted as the creed of the Han Empire, and Confucian scholars gained prominent status as the core of the civil …show more content…
The Warring States Period was so full of constant violence and war that philosophers began to reflect on the nature of society itself and the role of the individual within that society. From these intellectual inquiries led to the development of three schools of thought, such as Legalism. The founders, Duke of Wen, his advisor Han Feizi , and Li Si instituted Legalist reforms in Qin, which helped it develop economically and militarily, allowing the First Emperor of Qin, Qin Shi Huangdi, to win control of the central parts of today 's China in a single kingdom under his rule. Qin Shi Huangdi ruled with brutal methods using Legalism to subdue the warring states and unify his country. Legalism kept the citizens under the system of discipline, believing that people were bad and needed to be controlled with strict laws and harsh punishments which scared them into obeying the laws.Thus, the impact of Legalism on history is the establishment of a centralized state in China. Legalist methods in fact were responsible for ending the Period of the Warring States and for the Unification of China. The Qin dynasty was short-lived, but set the stage for the Han dynasty which followed, and which governed all of China from a single central

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    East Asia Dbq Analysis

    • 1307 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The Nationalist Party stressed the need to unify China under a strong central government and bring the imperialist intruders under control. Internally, the cause of this continuity was the isolation that the Chinese had been practicing for centuries. This isolation prevented the Chinese from obtaining vital military technology, which led to shock when the Chinese were unable to defend their borders. The inability to defend their borders in turn created fear amongst the Chinese people and spurred acts of aggression (AN). Externally, this continuity was caused by the defeat of the Chinese against the British in the Opium Wars.…

    • 1307 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Facing persistent warfare during the Warring States period and barbarian incursions after unification, the Qin and Han government did not have the luxury of time because their survival was at stake. Therefore, through an authoritative central state and a system of external rewards and punishments, the government demanded obedience from their people and harnessed their labor through coercion. Nonetheless, each version of Chinese government proselytized by the ancient philosophers was based on a societal hierarchy with one ruler in command while the subjects dutifully…

    • 1534 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The government kept being indifferent to the Japanese expansion in the west, but the communist party gave the people hope to solve the foreign affairs and the domestic ones, too. Consequently, as Communist Party strengthened, the idea of communism was widely supported. Later, when the People’s Republic of China was established, communism took root in Chinese society. The Revolution of 1949 was an uprising demanding a switch of the government to a pro-communism government. The revolution, also known as Chinese Communist Revolution, has shown the culture of Chinese society that deeply inherited Mao’s belief.…

    • 1197 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Han Dynasty Essay

    • 460 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Once again, the Han focused on education of the young. Also, the Qin practiced Legalism, harshly punishing any opposers. That made their society even more destructive and unethical, compared to the economical Han Dynasty. China had three main philosophical beliefs: Confucianism, Daoism, and Legalism. Daoism was a contemporary of Confucianism, while Legalism was a totally different institution.…

    • 460 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    They believed that changing the government was the only way to help China survive. Another similarity, both rebellions were self-strengthening movements. Finally, their biggest similarity was the fact that they had both been violent uprisings in China. They decided that they best and most effective way to rebel was through acts of violence. On the other hand, these rebellions had shared a handful of key difference.…

    • 1134 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The ethnic Chinese were also very annoyed towards the foreign rule by the Manchus, the ethnic group that dominated the best part of society after the fall of the Ming dynasty and Hong Xiuquan offered to help the ethnic Chinese overthrow the Manchu and to restore the rule of the ethnic Chinese, being the first to express a sort of nationalist identity in Qing China for the ethnic Han Chinese. Large numbers of the Chinese people rejected foreign rule by the Manchus, and these peasants would gather to Hong Xiuquan’s nationalist cause to return the ethnic Chinese to ruling China. Therefore, the Taiping Rebellion was revolutionary as it was key in the duplicating of a new philosophy, Chinese nationalism, which was a great change from the feudal mindsets of the Qing…

    • 853 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Superior Essays

    This was the start of the People’s Republic of China, which governs the Chinese mainland to this day. During the early 20th century, it was believed that traditional ideas and beliefs were what was holding the country back from modernizing into a new nation-state, and one of the major traditional beliefs that was regarded as a hinderance was Confucianism; it was harshly criticized by the New Culture Movement. Although some scholars thought that Confucianism could be reformed to fit with the new dynasty, an overwhelming number of reformers believed that there was no more use for Confucianism under the newfound democracy and science. With the implement of a completely new system of governing, the philosophy of Confucianism waned…

    • 1863 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The fighting in China changed from fighting the Japanese to fighting each other. Mao and his forces took advantage of Chiang’s weak forces, and took control of China. After his triumph, Mao put his communist government philosophies into place, and he tried to reform industries (Gifford 29, 30). When trying to explain his thoughts on china Mao declared, “Today, two big mountains lie like a dead weight on the Chinese people. One is imperialism, the other is feudalism (Zedong N.pag.).…

    • 1314 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Aiffering religions in China causing hostilities can be seen in previously with the Muslim rebellions. Because the Chinese “despised the Muslim for their different religion and their way of life and antagonized them socially and politically” (Brown 191), the Muslim eventually rebelled against the Qing. In light of this, scholars strived to reincorporate a “strict Confucian curriculum” into the education system, as a preventive measure to avoid future religious conflict (208). Incorporating Confucianism into education was a way for the Qing to ensure citizens were educated with the same beliefs and values, mitigating conflicting belief systems When the population follows the same set of ideas, religious conflict is generally reduced, and citizens are easier to manage and less likely to revolt against the…

    • 727 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Legalism stated that the common man was ignorant and malevolent and must be controlled by the government through harsh punishments and rewards. Confucianism, thought to be founded by philosopher Confucius in the 5th century B.C.E., was a system of principles that emphasized respect, virtue, and consideration. While possessing of a spiritual bent, Confucianism does not directly address religious concepts. According to Confucian philosophy, each person’s behavior is influenced by their superiors, and by setting a moral example, authorities could help to ensure that each person would behave in a benevolent and compassionate manner. The importance of education, rituals, family life and hierarchy were greatly stressed.…

    • 735 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays