Essay On Why Andrew Jackson Was A Good President

Superior Essays
In November of 1828, Andrew Jackson was elected as the seventh president

of the United States.1 He married to Rachel. Andrew Jackson was a great president.

He becomes a strong leaders, make the rights choice and he does good things for the

people.2 Andrew Jackson was a good president because he did a greats things such

as revolutionizing presidential camping. That he became the first modern president

and he used his powers to veto the bills that he saw harmful.3 Some people thought

that Andrew Jackson was a terrible president because he enforced Indian removal

and that he abused his power to veto in an effort to scare people and take more

control over the congress. Andrew Jackson is considers knows as good presidents

because
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Many Southerners believed these

policies promoted Northern growth at their expense. Jackson curbed the American

System by vetoing road and canal bills beginning with the Maysville Road in 1830.9

Andrew Jackson was elected by popular vote, as president he sought to act as

a beacon for the common man.10 Jackson before becoming president was the first

man elected into the House of Representatives. Shortly after he briefly served in the

Senate, a general and war hero of The Battle of 1812 where he defeated the British

at New Orleans.11 Andrew Jackson who seemed to be a beacon of light for the

common man and working class showed them that hard work really will get you

somewhere. On the day of his inaugural speech more than fifteen thousand people

8 Andrew Jackson’s military career

9 The same

10 Frank Friedel and Hugh Sidey, “Andrew Jackson,” The Presidents Of The United

States Of America (White House Historical Association, 2006)

https://www.whitehouse.gov/1600/presidents/andrewjackson (accessed
…show more content…
Rachel was not always his she belonged to another man, but Andrew Jackson

cared not what the father and fiancée would do all he cared about was his wife.

Many weeks later Rachel moved to the Hermitage, but later on in coming weeks

rumors would spread about Rachel and Andrews illegitimate marriage. Andrew

differed from husband to politician; this was because any of Andrews rivals would

be looking to tear down the president at a moments notice. Two of his many rivals

he did not like were Henry Clay and James Madison, it was believed these two had a

corrupted bargain meaning the election was rigged and so Jackson lost the

presidency.

Jackson spent much of his eight years as President trying to destroy the

national Bank, which had been chartered by Congress in 1816 as a national center

for fiscal policy. Jackson felt that the Bank was an unfair monopoly and that it

abused or might abuse its significant power that had partly caused the disastrous

Panic of 1819. Jackson went to great lengths to destroy the Bank, a crusade

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