Essay On Third Party Voting

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Third-Party Voting Is Not An Option

More than any election before, voters want a viable third-party candidate. We have third-party candidates, of course, but none of them are going to win. The system of government we have set up completely blocks any third-party candidate from even having a chance of winning. Even candidates that aren’t a third party candidate and win the majority vote, Al Gore, for example, aren’t guaranteed to win. In 2000, Al Gore won the majority vote for most states, but because of the electoral college, Bush won the election overall. A third-party candidate with even less support than Gore has almost no chance at winning with the electoral college. Every single person in the U.S. could vote for a Gary Johnson or
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Depending on who becomes president this election, our government will either continue to work towards being progressive or double back and completely change courses. For both sides of the political spectrum, this election is just too important to let a third-party candidate win. The next president will also get to choose supreme court justices. The balance right now is 5-4 leaning conservative, and a third-party candidate will completely throw off the balance. Not to mention, individuals that lean strongly one way politically understand that letting a third-party candidate choose justices could be devastating. Currently, foreign policy is a large issue. The world right now is tense and waiting with bated breath to see how the U.S. will vote. The decisions we make on foreign policy affect every other country. Voting third-party could lead to a candidate that has less than desirable foreign policy views, on either side, winning. No third-party candidate has ever won, and this election is not the time to try to change that. The very course of our government relies on who wins this election, and no one wants to have a president they dislike in charge of

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