Water Related Metaphors For Immigration

Superior Essays
When you hear the word ‘flood’ what do you think of? The majority of us probably think of the scientific definition of the word: a natural disaster that happens when a large amount of water covers an area of land that is normally dry (Merriam-Webster Online). However, in recent years, this scientific definition has been taken out of context to form a tasteless political metaphor. In the United States, immigration has/is frequently referred to as a flood, a stream, a tide, a wave, a tsunami, or a flow. Politicians have been using water related terms to describe America’s immigration policy since President Ronald Reagan was in office. In his journal article, Stephen J. Heidt argues that President Reagan’s use of the “wave metaphor" guided and …show more content…
Contrary to Heidt’s beliefs, in this essay, I will argue that the use of the word ‘flood’ and other water related metaphors to describe immigrants coming to America are inappropriate. First, I will examine a story from the Bible to illustrate how water related metaphors discourage the acceptance of immigrants in America. Second, I will reveal how a certain derogatory term makes the use of water related metaphors prejudicial. Lastly, I will analyze a political advertisement in which a candidate uses one of these metaphors to describe his anti-immigration views. The Bible story of Noah’s Ark is the reason water metaphors such as the ‘flood metaphor,’ discourage the acceptance of immigrants in America. In the religious tale, a man by the name of Noah, was called upon by God to build an ark. God instructed Noah to build the ark because of the “Great Flood” he was …show more content…
In recent years, it has been used by not only politicians, but also by the general public to describe immigrants ‘flowing’ into the United States. However, the way that the word is used in context is discouraging to those innocent individuals who come to America in search of a better life. The word “flood” dates back to the story of Noah’s Ark, in which a flood killed nearly the whole human race. Using the word ‘flood’ to describe people crossing America’s border not only has a negative connotation, but also dehumanizes people who might have good intentions for coming to the United States. These types of metaphors are prejudicial and is currently being used by political candidates who have anti-immigration views. This kind of negative connotation of the word ‘flood’ is inappropriate and unfair to be used as a means of explaining that immigrants are coming into the

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    With a shambled country, Americans will be able to smell the fire in the air. Jobs would be left unoccupied because of deportation, and millions of Americans would experience higher crime rates. The American people would have to figure out who would fill empty job seats which were once filled by undocumented immigrants. Since many Americans voted for Donald Trump, their voices on immigration policy will be heard when he is sworn into office. Trump’s aggressiveness on immigration is unconstitutional.…

    • 1563 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Great Essays

    Many of these fears that Americans have towards illegal immigration are unfounded and untrue. Therefore, America should help out these countries that have extreme violence and create a more simplistic path for citizenship for these illegal immigrants. In a recent poll, many Americans felt that illegal immigrants were hurting the American…

    • 1819 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Illegal Immigration 1986

    • 2384 Words
    • 10 Pages

    Even the former sponsors of the act for which it was named believed “legitimate questions can be raised about the effectiveness of” the law. The law made those living in the United States illegally, able to obtain legal status, augmented border security, and imposed penalties on businesses who knowingly employed illegal immigrants (Brad Plumer). These are many of the same policies in amnesty laws today. The history of amnesty policies show us that it is not an effective policy so other procedures should be attempted. Statistics show as well that amnesty is not a good idea because immigrants are found to be involved in crime.…

    • 2384 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Great Awakening Essay

    • 868 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Great Awakenings and the Separation of Church and State The concept of separating church and state did not arise from the Great Awakening. However, the Great Awakening influenced political and religious leaders that the two entities should be separated because they threaten the civil and religious liberties that the colonist had grown to expect over 150 years of neglect. The Great Awakening was a spiritual movement that swept through America that stressed individual personal relationship with God. (Henertta, 2013) The Great Awakening contributed to the separation of church and state by breaking down religious uniformity, undermined legally established churches and tax-supported ministers, and challenged the authority of ministers in civil matters…

    • 868 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    1980 Candidate Research

    • 2226 Words
    • 9 Pages

    This made him settle for his opponent George Bush after they had patched their political and personal differences. However, the phenomenon that can be considered as to have greatly impacted and propelled the rise of Reagan and to have shaped his presidency goes back to 1978. During this year, Howard Jarvis, who was the conservative activist, launched what is deemed as the first major campaign, successful tax revolt on citizens through coming up with an elaborate campaign. This included Proposition 13 that was a referendum question about the California ballot that rolled back tax rates on property (Lerman, 2002). At that time of slow economic growth as well as stagnated economy, this revolt against taxes had a tremendous appeal to Americans.…

    • 2226 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Nationalization of the Suez Canal An analysis through Prospect Theory On 26th July, 1956 Gamal Abdel Nasser nationalized the Suez Canal and the reason that he gave for the nationalization was that he required funds for the building for the Aswan dam. Though in reality it was an act of revenge against the French, British and Americans because they had recently refused to fund the building of Aswan Dam and he wanted to establish Egypt as the leader of middle-east by embarking an end to the British and French dominance in Africa and Middle-east. In my research essay I analyze this issue which is known as the Suez Canal Crisis through prospect theory. According to this theory people or institutions make decisions on potential value of gains and…

    • 843 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    He is also advised by many top political heads of different department’s agencies. Such as Joint Chief of Staff. He helps advise the president how to strategies in foreign conflicts. For example President Obama has recently nominated Gen. Martin Dempsey, Army chief of staff, to become chairman of Joints Chiefs of Staff. And well now help Obama on overseas conflicts and well help him strategies.…

    • 985 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Few things are more controversial than immigration. The wave of immigrants across U.S. borders enrages many native-born residents. Throughout history, immigrants have made their way to the U.S. from places all over the world, bringing new blood which has energized the American economy and enriched the intellectual, social, and cultural life in more ways than one. Despite many things the nation owes to the work of immigrants, at various times nativists have tried to close the door on people wishing to come in. Although many citizens believe that immigrants steal jobs, unfairly draw government benefits, and alter the social fabric of the United States, there is great danger in overreacting to the issue.…

    • 1219 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In the year 1798 America became a place of chaos after the unconstitutional laws passed under the name of the Alien & Sedition Acts. The Alien portion of the Acts increased the years someone had to live in America to gain citizenship and also gave the government the power to imprison or deport immigrants under the suspicion that they were spies. The Sedition portion restricted all American citizens from saying anything controversial about the government. The Alien & Sedition Acts were unconstitutional because newspaper editors and many others were arrested for practicing their freedom of speech, there was a great deal of debate between the Federalists and the Jeffersonian Republicans because the laws weakened the Democratic-Republican…

    • 1099 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Another example of the same concept is when explaining how Americans who are “express[ing] outrage over a punishment that causes permanent scarring” are being “culturally arrogant”(“Time to Assert American Values” 180). Facts and the extents of that statement are not fully explored and can be detrimental to the argument. Unlike “Rough Justice”, “Time to Assert American Values” doesn’t have strong evidence and facts to support the argument. There are too many holes in the ideas being presented which makes it less effective at developing an…

    • 724 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays