Essay On The Stonewall Rebellion

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On June twenty-seventh, 1969 the Stonewall Rebellion, also known as “the emblematic event in modern lesbian and gay history” had started. It was a time where police and agents from the Alcoholic Beverage Control Board were called in to look for violations of the alcohol control laws in a bar named the Stonewall Inn because it was believed that they did not have a liquor license. Most of the raids were common on gay bars and the regular routine for patrons. Although most were fearful that their names would be associated with such establishments they either submitted to arrest or quietly vacate the premises. The Stonewall Inn was a gay bar at fifty-one – fifty-three Christopher Street located in Greenwich Village. Two things were thought to …show more content…
The first is that they urge Gay businessmen to step forward and open gay bars that will be run legally with competitive pricing and a healthy social atmosphere. Making sure that these bars are legal and healthy will stop the suspicion of these places being associated with violations. The second thing that the community encourages is that Homosexual men and women boycott places like the Stonewall. This will help get the criminal elements out of gay bars by simply making it unprofitable for them. Lastly, Homosexual citizens of New York City, and concerned Heterosexuals should write to mayor Lindsay demanding a thorough investigation and effective action to correct this intolerable situation that occurred. Thus, this event has taken on a mythic proportion and is notable every year by a parade held in New York City on the last Sunday in June during Gay Pride week. This parade helps so the reassure and represent homosexual for equality no matter what their gender preference

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