The Byzantine Empire: The Justinian Code

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The Byzantine Empire was established in 324 BC by Constantine I the Great when he overthrew Maxentius as the king of Rome. Emperor Constantine I should not be just be recognized for founding the Byzantine Empire but also for promoting Christianity and was the first emperor to die a Christian. This emperor made it advantageous to be a Christian and therefor society found it to be more acceptable to practice. The emperor promoted and favored Christians in government jobs and he restored Christian property that had been lost during the prosecutions of Christians. Emperor Theodosius I held the Second Ecumenical Council of the Church in 381which fought Arianism, a religious doctrine that says Jesus Christ (son) was inferior to God. Their counter …show more content…
In the Byzantine Empire the emperor ruled the church and the state which meant for the church, that the emperor appointed and dismissed bishops as he pleased. The empire has its own separate government, society was becoming ever more complex and communication with the western part of the empire was difficult. To resolve these problems Justinian assembled a panel of legal experts to legally help regulate society and they created a uniform code called the Justinian Code. The code consists of four parts; The Code, 5,000 Roman Laws that were considered useful, The Digest, summarized some of the greatest legal persons opinions on the laws, The Institutes, a textbook that told law students how to use the laws, and the Novellae (New Laws), presented legislative that was passed after 565. The codes had laws that regulated all aspects of a person’s life. However this code could not repair the damage done previously so, Constantinople’s crumbling city was being rebuilt during 500 BC by Justinian. The frequent intruders of the city caused Emperor Anastasius I to also build a 14 mile stone wall along the coastline of the city but it was actually carried out by …show more content…
This emperor sought more than to fix just the social aspects of the town but Justinian saw church buildings as “the most visible sign of the close connection between the church and the state in his empire”. He built and restored many churches however the most significant architecture is the Hagia Sophia, a church building that was destroyed during a riot but was restored by Justinian. This building project also included the restoration and building of schools, baths, aqueducts (bridges), law courts and hospitals. The classical cultures influenced the Byzantine Empire and some of their values had carried over. The citizens in the empire valued classical works and education from them. This love of Greek and Roman works allowed the Great Works to be preserved and have a cultural influence during the Renaissance. In 532, citizens were at a chariot race and they were angry at the government for being too severe in putting down a previous riot that was started because of team rivalry. The citizens stormed the city and even the palace. Emperor Justinian wanted to flee but his wife Theodora persuaded him to stay and eventually the riot was

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