Essay On The Aztecs

1035 Words 5 Pages
The Aztecs were a powerful and highly advanced civilization that ruled the majority of present day Mexico in the 15th century. At their peak, they established a very organized society which revolved majorly around religion. Aqueducts were constructed, agriculture was cultivated, and their empire seemed to be constantly growing. Astrology was, arguably, one of the more important and fundamental achievements of the Aztec civilization. The development of the calendar became an important part of their lives specifying religious purpose. Unfortunately, their peak of great success and achievements were short lived. The arrival of the Spanish conquistadors quickly brought them their demise. Today, Aztec culture remains present in modern day Mexico. …show more content…
Their artificial floating gardens, chinampas, were responsible for the cultivation of an abundance of various crops. The chinampas field stretched out over 23 hundred acres on lakes. Chinampas were small, rectangular islands that were artificially made by the Aztecs and contained vegetation on top that would allow up to six crops to be grown at once (Aghajanian 2007). Small rows were strategically placed in between the chinampas in order for canoes to fit through, allowing easier access to the crops. Irrigation systems, such as aqueducts and damns, also created by the Aztecs themselves, provided the water for the crops as did the water from the lake. The Aztec’s diet consisted of mostly the crops grown on the chinampas, which were vegetables and fruits (Aghajanian 2007). The calendars show us that the Aztec civilization was very intelligent. A common misconception is that there is only one calendar when in fact there are two. One called Xiuhpohualli and the other Tonalpohualli (Hassig, …show more content…
Its purpose was agricultural. It determined the seasons of the year as well as what rituals or events were to be performed on each given day. It was this calendar that directed them to perform human sacrifices (Van Tuerenhout 2005). The division in this calendar was between eighteen months, in which one month was equivalent to twenty days. At the end of each year, 5 days were added to complete the three hundred sixty five day cycle, but these days were considered bad and unlucky (Hassig,

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