Essay On Suspense In Pride And Prejudice

723 Words 3 Pages
After applying to colleges, you wait impatiently to receive a letter notifying you of the colleges’ verdict, everyday you’d rush to check your mailbox, only to be disappointed, and seemingly more anxious than before. It does not necessarily have to be a letter from a college, it could be your first paycheck that is taking longer to arrive than you anticipated, or a letter from the IRS that can either bring joy or dread depending on the context of the letter. Ironically even though our daily life is becoming more and more reliant on advanced technology, letters still effect our daily life significantly. Before the Internet and telephone, the most common form of distant communication was letters. One would wait several weeks or months to receive …show more content…
In Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice letters play a crucial role in creating suspense, altering a character’s emotions and enhancing the drama in the novel. The letters also serve as a revelation that open vessels to new perspectives for the audience. As one of the first letters in the novel, Jane’s letter to Elizabeth (Vol I. Chapter VII pages 22-23) acts an entry way to a new scenery. In Jane’s letter she notifies Elizabeth of her illness, and the Bingley’s insisting that she stays at their home until she is relieved of her cold. (Vol I. Chapter VII page 23) The significance of this letter is underrated, because although it seems like a simple update, it actually opens the door for the audience to see the Bingley’s and Mr. Darcy as individuals instead of objects of speculation amongst the people of Hertfordshire. Jane’s letter not only caused Elizabeth to fear for the worst, but it also gave Elizabeth and the audience a chance to judge and observe the wealthier counterparts of the town, in closer proximity than previous circumstances allowed. Upon receiving the letter Elizabeth rushed to reveal the true …show more content…
Collins also thickens the drama in Pride and Prejudice. The main difference between the subsequent drama caused by Mr. Collins’s letter and the drama caused by Jane’s letter was the context and meaning behind it. As the heir of Longbourn estate, Mr. Collins attempts to be seen as a respectable man through his letter, but fails at doing so after admitting that the thought behind the letter originated from Lady Catherine de Bourgh and she should be credited for it. (Vol. I Chapter XIII page 47) Through the manner the letter is written, the narrator places Mr. Collins in a position to laughed at for his imbecility, but his personality can be quite dangerous, mostly because he is willing to do anything he is told to do, as long as it would place him closer to the aristocrats of the society, but then again it could just be that he is not intelligible enough to know that what society tells him may not always be morally or even ethically correct. In his letter, Mr. Collins spends a great deal of his letter discussing Lady Catherine’s life, and immense wealth before getting to his intended point; his decision to marry any one of his daughters,

Related Documents