Essay On Social Exclusion

Improved Essays
Introduction
The feeling of belonging has been a phenomenon that has been researched thoroughly in the psychological field. Sense of belonging has been defined as being under the impression that one is involved in their environment. A person feels a connection with those around them and they feel as though they are a valued member of their community (Hagerty et al, 1992). It has been stated that a sense of belonging is a fundamental need for human beings therefore when it is removed, it can lead to negative consequences (Baumeister & Leary, 1995). The removal of an individual’s sense of belonging can occur due to an individual experiencing social exclusion. Social exclusion can also be referred to as ostracism and this is the perceived lack
…show more content…
For example Twenge et al in 2001 found that aggressive behaviour was the result of social exclusion. In this experiment, participants experienced social exclusion either by being told that they would end up alone in the later years of their life or that the other participants had rejected them. As a result of these manipulations the participants displayed more aggressive behaviour. Those that were excluded gave someone who insulted them a more negative job evaluation. Moreover when a target had insulted the participants, participants in the excluded conditions blasted the target with higher levels of an aversive noise. However, participants who were excluded did not display more acts of aggression towards someone who praised them. This showed that emotion wasn’t the determining factor on whether aggressive behaviour was displayed but a person experiencing social exclusion was the reason for the presence of aggression (Twenge et al, 2001).
Emerging research into the consequences of social exclusion has also found that social exclusion can encourage social reconnection and trust. Derfler-Rozin et al in 2010 found that participants who were told that they were likely to be excluded were more trusting toward others compared to both control conditions, i.e. people who were actually excluded and those who were not excluded. This result suggests that people who are at risk of being excluded were trying to “fix” their social situation by trusting others, thereby setting up a possibility for

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Being rejected from an in-group causes a negative effect on self-esteem also known as your self confidence. Getting blown off by friends or being dumped by your boyfriend, that can have a real impact on our lives, these effects affects the way we feel about ourselves, it may reduce the quality of a person’s life in many different ways. Gender differences in self-esteem studies show that males have a higher rate of self-esteem problems compared to females. These effects may be traced back to past or ongoing stressful events for example, a relationship breakdown, troubles in…

    • 807 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Verbal rules seem to have a slightly less strict following than nonverbals. When breaking the phonological rule and semantic rule, I was corrected or met with confusion, but I also received responses of humor. My family was at first amused by my breaking of the phonological rules, but became annoyed. Beca’s responses were a variation of amused and confused when I broke the semantic rule. Contrastingly, within communication contexts where I experimented with breaking nonverbal rules, I was met with confusion, annoyance, distrust, but no amusement.…

    • 1885 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    This indicated that the reader more easily understood the victim’s hurt. However, by the middle of the target sentence the reader integrated the character’s hurt response to ironic criticism more slowly than literal criticism, indicated by overall slower reading times for the target sentence after the critical emotion word. This would suggest that readers initially thought the victim was more likely to be hurt following ironic criticism rather than literal criticism. However, by the end of the sentence the reader integrates the victim’s hurt response more slowly because they view the critique as less hurtful and more humorous. The results of experiment two are that if the amused emotion was portrayed by the protagonist, the reading time was shorter than when the amused emotion was portrayed by the victim.…

    • 1751 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    On the other hand, it also reveals how people that are self-certain do not get affected by these things “as they have a less suspicious mindset in the first place, and their identity is less sensitive to social signals that suggest acceptance or rejection by others” (Prooijen 3). The self-certain people will be less susceptible to believing the conspiracy theories because they don’t feel the need to fit in and are better at making their own inferences. Therefore, people that have high levels of self-uncertainty are more likely to believe conspiracies are true. Another example of high levels of uncertainty in the individual would be the actions and reactions towards the Black Lives Matter movement. The Black lives matter movement is a movement that was created in…

    • 1523 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    “Residual rule breaking is essentially deviance for which there is no clear category- it is not a crime, but it may be behavior that draws attention and makes the societal audience uncomfortable” (141). A person who has just been labeled mentally disabled is not deviant, until he or she behaves in a way that society thinks disabled people should act. Once the doctor creates limitations and the individual believes that he or she must need assistance, the individual has now accepted the label of being mentally ill. Labeling creates a self-fulfilling prophesy. “It sets in motion several mechanisms which conspire to shape the person in the image people gave of him” (Becker, 1963/1973). A normal person can be having a rough week and they may be feeling a bit down than usual.…

    • 1216 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Abandonment is an act of giving up your rights, interest, or ownership without reclaiming it. It can be either a person or a property that someone truly values. There are two types of abandonment: psychological or physical (thefreedictionary.com, 2007). Psychological abandonment refers to the feeling of indifference or lack of intimacy which is focused on the emotions of a certain individual. Physical abandonment occurs when there is a person choosing to end an existing relationship with someone.…

    • 794 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    On the other hand, people who are not psychosocially healthy have trouble communicating with others, fitting into society, accepting/giving support, and sometimes being empathetic. Both psychosocially healthy and unhealthy people can benefit from learning from their behaviors, emotions, and the consequences of their actions to better themselves. 2. Define social bonds and social supports as they relate to social health. Social bonds are the connections we have with other people, and the strength of these connections vary depending on the “closeness and attachment”, as the textbook put it, that people have with each other.…

    • 980 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Essay On Social Isolation

    • 454 Words
    • 2 Pages

    The result of social isolation is diverse and multi-faceted. Social isolation may cause anxiety, depression, or withdrawals (Hortulanus, 2006). House (2001) suggested that the feeling of social isolation may kill people. The results of social isolation can be manifested in the family by having the individual rebel against others in the family or refuse to take part in family activities. At the workplace, it may lead to reduced productivity or unexplained or long absences.…

    • 454 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Media Stigma

    • 1632 Words
    • 7 Pages

    “Stigma can affect people through mechanisms of direct discrimination, such as a refusal to hire the person, structural discrimination, such as [having] fewer resources for research and treatment, or social psychological processes that involve the stigmatized person’s perceptions (Link).” Based on Link’s research, one can conclude that not only does stigma affect an individual’s interpersonal relationships, but also their intrapersonal conflicts. Because stigma likely results in a person not being hired, the person internalizes feelings of worthlessness, negatively affecting their self-image. Because of these feelings, the individual refuses to do anything because they are already set up for failure, engaging in the cognitive bias of self-fulfilling prophecy. In addition, internalized feelings of worthlessness causes someone to garner a fear of rejection. “It is undoubtedly threatening and personally disheartening to believe that one has developed an illness that others are afraid of” (Link).…

    • 1632 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    The term identifies and targets people from across the world who are at a social disadvantage. In other words, those individuals, or sometimes communities are banned from social rights, opportunities or resources that are usually accessible to normal and non-excluded communities. Some of these rights and resources can prove crucial for social integration, such as job opportunities, healthcare, education, housing, etc. Moreover, many people find it difficult to differentiate between poverty and social exclusion. The main difference between poverty and social exclusion is the fact that social exclusion cannot be quantified whereas poverty can be quantitatively calculated.…

    • 1731 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays