Essay On Rome And Greek Civilizations

1257 Words 6 Pages
Both the Romans and the Greeks created large civilizations. They were differences and similarities in the way their people saw the world. The way people view the world naturally changes over time. The change can happen much faster if accompanied by a change in leadership, location, beliefs, or a combination of the few. Athens went through many transitions in power and this affected the worldview of its citizens and slaves. The Greeks found trade, treasure, and truth important. Comparatively, the Romans had a movement through various types of leadership. People went on strikes to gain power in some cases and we see some copies of their government styles in the United States. “Everything from capitalism, colonization, environmental destruction, …show more content…
The Romans went on to conquer the Greek colonies and Greece itself, and to become the great power in the Mediterranean. To a large extent they inherited the Greek view of the world. Although Greece and Rome were two different peoples, different civilizations and different cultures, the Romans to a very large extent viewed themselves as the cultural inheritors of the Greeks. Greece society was very complicated. It was made up of various city-states and had no real uniform view. However, both Rome and Greece viewed themselves as the betters of all others. To the Roman citizen you were either Roman or you were barbarian. A barbarian was hardly better than an animal. Both civilizations kept slaves and tried them poorly. Rome 's expansion expressed how they thought that rule under the Roman government was a gift to the people they conquered. At the peak of the Roman …show more content…
The columnar style externalizes architecture and lends itself to more of an ornamental character. The arch and vault lend themselves more to an interior perspective, but also have greater structural advantages. “According to Thucydides, Athenians were innovators, not emulators.” (Lualdi, 60) This statement can apply to many aspects of Greek culture and is very visible in their art. Greek life experienced high levels of political growth throughout the fifth-century. Furthermore, in Athens, the famous philosopher Socrates was challenging conventional wisdom and values with his views on ethics and morality, thus moving Greek philosophy in new directions. “Unlike Sophists, Socrates offered no classes and did not write his ideas down.” (Lualdi, 62) Socrates used conversation and seemingly never-ending critical thinking questioning to persuade his audience into his way of thinking. Socrates created many enemies throughout his time as a philosopher. He says in The Apology of Socrates “This inquisition has led to my having many enemies of the worst and the most dangerous kind, and has given occasion also to many calumnies.” In addition, Socrates reveals his humility in his knowledge saying “the truth is, O men of Athens, that God only is wise.” (Lualdi,

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