Essay On Role Of Engineers

1044 Words 5 Pages
Managers are the directing components of an organization’s resources by such possible means of coordination, instruction, facilitation, forecasting and delegation of the working arm. The foundation of a manager’s success begins with knowledge of the composition and function of the organization. Before the modern age of management specific education, a critical component of success would include the technical mastery of the corporation’s function. For example, in the Industrial Revolution managers were often workers promoted through the ranks due to their technical skills (Bedeian, Wren, Poel, and Royakkers, 2016, p. 103). As educated engineers emerged into society, their literacy and technical skills planted them into managing positions, tying …show more content…
However, engineers have also been integrated into management duties, and in today’s world, it is difficult to differentiate between the role of the engineer and the role of the manager. Engineers are becoming more prevalent, compared to their rarity roughly a century ago. Which means that engineers will work as the diligent and productive hand of a corporation as a manager orchestrates this production. Zooming in to the front lines of a corporation, presumably belonging in an engineer-related field, the manager combines efforts of multiple engineers to achieve a product, project, or goal. At this level, the manager will be an engineer him/herself, as they can specifically instruct and understand the exact processes taking place. This requires advanced interpersonal skills, for the manager must communicate effectively in order to successfully operate the department. As this picture of the company zooms out to higher rungs of the management ladder, administrative skills become more and more imperative. In cases of executive level management, it is common that these type of managers are often not engineers nor will they know any technical information on the assembly, processes and designs of the product. Instead, these managers understand the overall values associated with these processes and can enable company growth through their education and …show more content…
Communication, may it be oral, written and even nonverbal, is the key to conquering many challenges presented at the workplace. Universities lay basic foundations of written and oral communications; however, engineering programs continue to recognize more need for further communication courses, and continue to stress that classes must apply more pressure on students’ ability to write and present effectively. Such developments result in better prepared engineers that climb through the corporate ranks. The advantage of this type of education reflects alone with its monetary value to both the undergraduate and employer. Better communication enhances the efficiency of a workplace, increases tranquility between manager and employee, and adds to the culture of the work environment. The university’s ability to train these type of engineers will increase the university’s popularity among the degree seeking market, meaning more students and more alumni donation. However the draw back to raising the curriculum’s communication requirements is that it may decrease pass rates or decrease the time spent covering the technical material. Perhaps a modification to the education system for an engineering-management career would be to subdivide each student into what they expect out of their career. Students capable or desiring the combination of elite communication skills while keeping up

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