Essay On Radical Change In Arthur Miller's Death Of A Salesman

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Society is often doused with radical change as it is necessary for its improvement. Often, several changes in certain situations can cause for man to long for the past- usually done through flashbacks and aspirations for future plans. In Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman, the main character, a salesman known as Willy Loman, confronts endless interruptions of flashbacks to the past in hope to bring back cherishing moments in which he urges his son, Biff Loman, to model his father in also becoming a salesman. Miller’s constant interjections of Willy’s flashbacks and overall drive to recreate success illustrates man’s method of coping through several changes in himself and society as they are unable to directly accept their loss of identity. …show more content…
Willy is often frustrated by the sudden changes in the work force- worrying him that he will soon meet his end as a salesman. He states, “There’s more people! That’s what’s ruining this country! The competition is maddening! Smell the stink from that apartment house! And the one on the other side…” (17). He believes that as more people populate, the competition for jobs drastically increase as they compete to gain Willy’s position removing him from the workforce. With all of his heightened madness, he is drawn to flashback to times when he was successful and joyful. Willy finds himself in a moment in which he has a resilient bond with his two sons - especially Biff, his oldest son. These moments of Willy’s escape relieve him and help him rethink the sudden discharge he just laid out. Miller’s insert of a flashback contrasts the two situations at hand, allowing one to be seen as the better option as Willy’s fear nearly terminates due to the flashback. Ultimately, this gives him reason to keep pursuing his long dream of being successful. The protagonist’s method in handling the drastic changes to the work force helps the display man’s inability to accept …show more content…
Willy’s ignorance in seeing his son’s true identity reveals that he is unable to accept the truth about his stubbornness to adapt constant change. Early on in Act I, Biff is characterized as the star football player in high school bringing lots of potential in his future. Biff has “[been made] captain” of the team followed by “a crowd girls every time the classes change” (31). Additionally to his early success, his connection with his father presents Biff as a thoughtful child- “I’m taking one play for Pop. You watch me, Pop, and when I take off my helmet, that means I’m breaking out. Then you watch me crash through that line!” (32). Biff had the qualifications to be a successful person in the coming years; but as a result to his failure in his math course, Willy rids him. Now, Willy believes that “Biff is a lazy bum” (17). Biff’s situation does not allow him to regain control of his life as he does not have the support of his father. Willy’s ignorance if the situation at hand causes him to create more salesmen through his son as he wants to bring back his identity through others even though he has already lost it. Willy’s ideology of having more of himself in others demonstrates his process of relieving the pain caused by sudden change during the height of capitalism. Willy slowly loses

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