Essay On Power And Work Discipline

1725 Words 7 Pages
In our society today, power, work discipline, and maximization of productivity has changed over time. The definition of work has changed from the time of feudalism to capitalism. Feudalism is described when serf and peasants offer their best harvest to feudal lord for protection. While capitalism, is defined as a means of production that is privately owned and used for profit consumption. From the definitions, it is evident that agriculture existed in the period of feudalism and production of goods for sale existed in capitalism. Capitalism specifically, has introduced a whole new perception of work. Work has changed as we have approached the rising of intensive use of machineries for production. Also, the emergence …show more content…
I will then compare all three articles together to consider the effects of power and work discipline on maximizing production in capitalism. By analyzing each article categorically, it will become evident that the rise of capitalism has created more ways in making work disciplines and direct and indirect dominance advantageous to maximizing production. And also, understanding impact of capitalism on workers for each time period based on each authors’ comparison. Sidney Mints, sweetness and power, showed a hint of industrialization. This occurred in the early industrial capitalism. (1985: 87) describes how Europe exploited slaves for the production of crystalized sugar (1985: 22). Sugar was sweet, luxury crystalline that showcased Europe status and importance (1985: 55). The whole point of production was to increase consumption and production for sale (1985: 45). England became one of the main center for producing sugar (1985: 54). A lot of African slaves were imported into England for their labor powers (1985: 55). The kind of labor in those times were forced and unpaid. England maximized the slaves to the extent to which it was part of the greatest world makers of sugar and exporters. …show more content…
Power was however, was much more invisible in this case. In terms of work discipline, David Harvey argues that the management, conception, control and execution was the work discipline that made the new system of mass production possible. (1989: 126) As mentioned earlier, the pyramidal structure had fewer people as we moved up the scale. The most people were found at the bottom of the pyramid. (1989: 124) This includes the assembly line of workers. Also, five-dollar for eight hours per day was a trick for very intense labor work and exploitation. The high pay per day gravitated worker the more to exploit them unconsciously. To solidify the argument, David Harvey also argues that Fordism, as a new kind of society was built by applied power (1989: 126). He also argues that the purpose of the five dollar, eight-hour day was a way to secure worker’s involvement with the discipline required to work the mass production system assembly line (1989: 126). David Harvey also argued how power became invisible when Ford lured workers into working so that they can have enough buy their own car and be their boss. (1989:

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