Essay On Placebo

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A placebo is a harmless pill, medicine, or procedure prescribed more for the psychological benefit to the patient than for any physiological effect. Researchers use placebos during studies to help them understand what effect a new drug or some other treatment might have on a particular condition. Researchers then compare the effects of the drug and the placebo on the people in the study. That way, they can determine the effectiveness of the new drug and check for side effects.
The use of placebo is a standard component of medical research. The placebo control might be considered when no other adequate therapy for the disease exists or the active therapy has serious side-effects not suitable. Some of its indications remain controversial to this
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If there were no effective treatments for childhood diseases without the use of children to find the treatment is a very morally hard decision. Do you risk your child and maybe someone else’s child because you don’t want to find a treatment, do you go in blind not knowing the end results or the complications your or other children could face. These are questions that parents, their families and doctors all have to think about. Do or would the benefits of the procedure outweigh the bad. Not making the child suffer in any way shape or form is the most important thing that needs to be looked at. Although we wouldn’t know if the child would be given the actual treatment or the placebo extending suffering for a child is never morally acceptable in my eyes.
Two perspectives on placebo-prescribing the first one being the “consequentialist”, whose perspective focused on the potential for beneficial outcome of placebo-prescribing. Some participants thought placebos were beneficial and should be used clinically. The other perspective “autonomy” emphasized the harms caused by the deceptive processes thought necessary for placebo-prescribing. These participants judged placebo as unacceptable because placebo-prescribers deceive patients, therefore a doctor who prescribes placebos cannot be trusted and the patients' autonomy is

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