Ideal To Real Body Image Analysis

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Alexander, B. (n.d.). Ideal to real: What the 'perfect ' body really looks like for men and women. Retrieved March 01, 2016, from http://www.today.com/health/ideal-real-what-perfect-body-really-looks-men-women-2D79582595

Bryan Alexander, the publisher of “Ideal to real…” for Today, was given various sets of images to reflect “ideal” and “real” body size and shape. Alexander investigates the difference between society’s ideal body shape and the actual average size and shape. He also suggested men and women are close in agreement on ideal male bodies. Images provided in the article show men’s ideal image of themselves is to have broad, strong shoulders and chest, which definitely differs from the real image. For women the ideal image is to
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(2006). Absorbing society 's influence: Body image self-discrepancy and internalized shame. Sex Roles, 54(9-10), 727-731. doi:http://0-dx.doi.org.library.svsu.edu/10.1007/s11199-006-9038-7
In this text Gayle Besssenoff investigates the comparison between body image and cultural norms. Bessenoff goes on to talk about how women whose body differs from the cultural standards may influence body-related shame and self-discrepancy. She also states that these cultural norms become internalized which then become personal values. These people affected by gender norms feel like they have to live up to these standards society has set, and if they don’t fit in they feel terrible about themselves in return. Bessenoff also includes that a major cultural standard is that the average woman should be extremely thin therefore when women don’t have a BMI of 16.62 they feel extremely bad about themselves. The author concludes by saying there are injunctive cultural norms that are almost impossible to live up to. These standards are related to personal body ideals which leads to body-shaming. Overall, I found this article to be intriguing and easy to read. It had a lot of great information and was completely
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This article goes into depth about boys and girls having a sex-typed physical appearance based on gender stereotypes. McDermid and the others suggest stereotypical gender connotations affect how boys and girls view eachother. The study shows that on a scale of 1 (feminine) to 10 (masculine) women who were beautiful were those who dressed more feminine and men who were handsome were those dressed more masculine. The authors concluded physical appearance does affect how peers and people in general view one another. The article was very interesting, especially to see the results with people who had gender identification disorder. Overall the article had a lot of information but was outdated and could possibly be faulty just based on the different time

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