Note Taking Analysis

805 Words 4 Pages
1. The research-based justifications for teaching students to develop strong note-taking skills that are presented in the “Note-Taking Strategies for Students with Disabilities” article are research done by Divesta and Gray in 1972 and Peper and Mayer in 1986 had “indicated that students with learning disabilities are often “passive learners””. (Weishaar p. 392) This means that they will not engage in class discussion, raise their hands if confused in hopes of not embarrassing themselves, or because they cannot comprehend everything going on. Divesta and Peper’s research found that students with learning disabilities who took notes were “actively engaged in the learning process, thus improving comprehension” (Ibid). This study seems to be …show more content…
Research has found this strategy more effective when students with mild disabilities use this strategy compared to using conventional note taking, resulting in improved comprehension of information and students will record more information. Guided notes are another tool that is effective for students with disabilities and research has shown students who continually use this tool generate “greater gains on tests” compared to conventional note-taking, and proved more useful when students used this technique during review. Columnar Format was another technique that effectively increased students understanding of information and according to Saski, Swicegood, and Carter in 1983 found it helped to improve the note-taking skills of students with learning problems during lectures” (Weisharr p. 394). Through these techniques teachers can enable their students to have the necessary tools to succeed in future …show more content…
One example from the article that I find to be most applicable to my own ideas about teaching is the tool of teaching students guided notes. I have come across many students who have disabilities, and found using guided notes is very helpful for them. Guided notes keep students engaged during class, and helps them to recall the main ideas the teacher wants students to remember. Weisharr’s research has found that what guided notes offers to students is the students “are given an outline that lists and structures the main ideas prior to learning” (Weisharr p. 393). Any time you can outline for students what is important is well worth the effort. This process will help them when they go to make an outline for writing an essay be ensuring that they organize their paper to make sure their main ideas are well argued, or what have you. This technique according to Lazarus in 1991 has helped students “produce greater gains on tests”, compared to regular note-taking. As an educator I don’t want to bog my students down with information they will see as not important. My objective as a teacher is to give them the tools to success in later life. Guided notes don’t just help to improve student’s learning; it helps the teacher who can use these notes as an informal assessment come test time or for review homework. Guided notes help students review previously learned information, whereas conventional notes would be difficult for a student with disabilities to discern what is important to

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