Essay On Malcolm X And Martin Luther King Jr

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Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Junior are perhaps the most well-known African Americans in the civil rights struggle and history of African Americans. Although they fought for civil rights and other ideas, they did struggle in dissimilar ways. Their differences in the fight for civil rights and liberties are not unique since in the history of the US, there are not two leaders that are exactly alike (Hatch, 37). The differences in Malcolm X’s and Martin Luther Junior’s approaches in the civil rights struggle could be attributed to their upbringing in different family and community settings. First, whereas Martin Luther King Junior was brought up in a middle class family and received good education, Malcolm X was brought up in an underprivileged …show more content…
In his philosophy, he set out to achieve his objectives by whatever means applicable or necessary, even if it implied violence. If physically attacked, he would fight back in a physical manner. However, later in his life, Malcolm X became nonviolent.
The differences in Malcolm X’s and Martin Luther King’s approach were clearly portrayed during the famed Washington March on August 28, 1963. While King wanted the White and Black Americans to integrate, Malcolm felt that Black Americans should not have integrated with the other races, stating that the Blacks needed to operate separately and develop self-respect for their race (Mattson, 32).
Malcolm’s vision for society was reverence for people regardless of their race. He also believed that the way black people could be saved was not integration but separation from white society. He thus upheld racial pride. Just like other races elsewhere had done, he called upon the black society to patronize their own kind if, when, and where possible. He advocated separation and opposed forced segregation by the supposedly superior whites and affluent blacks in society. In its place, Malcolm proposed voluntary separation by two equals (Cone, 173). For King, society needed harmony between the American Dream and the Christian Church. Nevertheless, he criticized Christianity and the dream, prompting him to fight for an end to racism and incorporation of

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