Essay On Long Walk To Freedom

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The Outcome of Having the Strength to Power Onward Nelson Mandela once stated that everyone at some point in their lives will face hardships, which can either shape or destroy them depending on how they handle these conflicts. However, if they don’t give up hope plus continue to remain strong and fight, lingering opposing forces will fail in trying to break their spirits. This quote has proven to hold a certain degree of truth to it and could describe the whole human race in a nutshell. Yet, despite these claims, a lot of people disagree with Mandela’s statement and think that it can’t describe certain people, is simply impossible in shorter terms, and that there’s not enough information in it to put much thought into it. Nelson Mandela’s …show more content…
Without the difficulties and hardships that inevitably come with life, the human race would have no true desire to change things, for example, their lives, even if some factors certainly need adjusting. In Nelson Mandela’s Long Walk to Freedom, the Europeans in South Africa, also known as Afrikaans, were extremely unwilling to change the government structure and laws simply due to the fact that they were content with how things played out in their favor. They had absolutely everything they ever wanted available to them, but disregarded other races’ conditions because of this. (Mandela 111). Luxury and comfort can be deceiving, and it shielded the whites …show more content…
(Mandela 407, 432, 458). While Mandela was in prison, he was still determined to complete and apply for his studies, despite all of the obstacles that always stood in his way, like receiving the necessary books before their due dates for the specific courses he took (Mandela 411, 412, 413). He always took advantage of this little opportunity and never purposely stopped trying to study, despite the fact that over the years, prison officials eventually banned the prisoners from studying altogether on multiple occasions (Mandela 481). Then, he also had to deal with the endless flow of corrupt prison officials that sought out to destroy his confidence. Every time a rude or disrespectful warden came to work at Robben Island, Mandela refused to bow down to them and sometimes made them open their eyes before they left the island (Mandela 436, 438, 460, 462). Finally, despite the fact that he was in prison for about three decades, Nelson Mandela was still determined as ever to make South Africa a place where all nationalities could be viewed and treated equally, and because of his strong sense of dedication, his efforts were eventually rewarded. In the end of his autobiography, he took another step towards his dream when for the first time, South African citizens of all different types of races were allowed to vote

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