Essay On Immigration From 1965 To 1965

1150 Words 5 Pages
Immigration has always been a part of the larger story the United States. The Hart-Cellar Act of 1965 was a piece of immigration reform legislation, which ended the quota system by national origin established in 1924. This act once again allowed Asians to migrate to America. However, there was a limit placed of 120,000 immigrants from the Western Hemisphere. As a result of the act the floodgate opened up a massive new wave of immigration. From 1965 to 2010 38 million individuals migrated to the United States, this far surpasses the migration of 27 million people from 1882 to 1924. Along with greater numbers of migrants, immigration since 1965 has differed from immigration in the past in the source of immigration. In the last 50 years most …show more content…
Additionally, the number of individuals emigrating from Africa and the Middle East have increased. After the act went into effect these shifts were shocking, especially since limits were placed on immigration from the Western Hemisphere. Of the immigrants from Latin America, Mexicans represented the greatest proportion of the arrivals. The increase in individuals living in the United States from Mexican descent is due to poverty in Mexico, high birth rates, and proximity to America. From taking sociology courses I know that the act sparked a greater migration of families from Mexico because for men who were migrating to the United States for work traveling back and forth to see your family became more difficult. In addition to the decline in traditionally male jobs in manufacturing and increased employment in traditionally the amount roles and human services allowed for female immigrants to outnumber male …show more content…
Oaxaca who left Mexico City, Mexico in 2000. Before leaving Mexico he was an engineer in communications for the Navy, where he taught and helped install computers. In that position he had a good reputation and was financially stable. Along with a successful career, he was working towards obtaining a Master’s degree. On the other hand in the late 1990s, Mr. Oaxaca was concerned about the growing crime in Mexico City. His greatest concern was for the safety of his family, since his wife was robbed twice and did not want his children to grow up in fear. These fears motivated him and his wife to join his wife’s family in Faribault, Minnesota. When Mr. Oaxaca arrived he had little knowledge of English and was forced to give up his career as an engineer. Instead he began working in a restaurant, within six months he learned how to cook and run a restaurant. One year after arriving in the United States he opened up his own restaurant. Since migrating to America he has opened up multiple successful businesses. Last year he became a US citizen. The process of becoming a US citizen was long and difficult for Mr. Oaxaca, because he only came with a travel visa and had to go to multiple individuals in order to obtain a green card. This process also involved lots of paperwork, meetings, investigations, and tests. Currently he enjoys living in Marshall, due to their being less crime, traffic and pollution than Mexico City. Despite leaving behind a

Related Documents