Essay On How Did Jackie Robinson Changed The World

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The Man Who Changed Sports Forever With his ability to hit a single in the clutch, steal a base with his stellar speed, and to make remarkable plays with his glove Jackie Robinson transformed not only the game of baseball but a deeply divided nation at the same time. Robinson became the first African American baseball player to integrate Major League Baseball in 1947. During this time the nation was deeply segregated along racial lines. Jim Crow ruled the nation while African Americans were relegated to second-class citizenship. This was further emphasized with African Americans relegated to a hodgepodge lesser league, the American Negro League. Reflecting their social standing in the mid-twentieth century Jackie Robinson was able to …show more content…
However, Robinson did not fear anything in his uphill battle with desegregation. Whether it was publicly or behind closed doors, Robinson took the high road, and regardless of the hatred of the white crowds Robinson played hard. For example, refusing to sit in the back of a military bus landed him in trouble, but this displayed his courage and leadership. Number 42 had received the harshest treatment publicly than any other athlete on the field. Words of the wise from his Owner Mr. Rickey, “ I want the player with the guts not to fight back” (Warner Bros). Robinson displayed exactly this by not responding to the numerous n-words, the unfair treatment in public venues, poor calls made on the field, teammates petitioning not to play with him, public humiliation, pitchers throwing at it his head, and much more. One of the toughest and courageous forms of leadership is the refusal to retaliate and to power through the opposition. In my opinion, Robinson showed the greatest glimpse of his leadership against the Philadelphia Phillies. Ben Chapman the skipper of the Phillies stood outside of his dugout and continued to scream racial slurs and proclaim that Robinson was not wanted and did not belong in the major leagues. Robinson did not say a word and proceeded to score the winning run directly in front of Chapman’s face. This was …show more content…
Most white folks did not want a black man playing with the white men of the major leagues. The main goal of the owners and managers of the many baseball teams was to make money and win. “The more greed and lust for victory, the less discrimination. The more competition between teams and businesses, the more cooperation between the races” (Sailer). It has been said countless times that the competition of baseball helped desegregate sports. Branch Rickey was the first owner to break the “unwritten rule” in bringing an African American player into the major leagues. During Robinson’s era and today professional athletes are looked up to as heroes by many. As time passed, people began to witness Robinson’s great talents on the field and began to accept him. Whether it was his skin color or his playing abilities, Robinson was helping the Dodgers win. With Americans having the great desire to win, whites and African Americans began to bond over the common goal of winning and making money. Fans began to look up to Robinson as a “hero” and white kids in the park began to play baseball with African Americans and they imitated Robinson’s batting routines. Robinson’s unbelievable skill and the consistent wins brought everyone together. Although, segregation was not completely eliminated by the common goal of winning, but it was a great stride forward for

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