Analysis Of The Raid At Harper's Ferry By John Brown

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In October of 1859, the raid at Harper’s Ferry, led by John Brown, deepened the split between the North and South due to the brutality and violence used by Brown and his men in order to fight for the equality and freedoms that slaves in America deserved. Throughout 1859 to 1863, views in the North and South started to change as Democratic Southerners viewed all northerners as being solely identified by John Brown while the North split into radical abolitionists, who began to proclaim him as a martyr, and Northern Republicans, who saw the wrong that was present in the raid at Harper’s Ferry. Alongside growing tensions from Abraham Lincoln’s presidential win in 1860, the raid contributes to the start of the Civil War as the South becomes wary …show more content…
Horace Greeley, a devout abolitionists, attempts to unite his fellow northerners with the use of the word “we” as he explains how even though Brown took unnecessary means to fight for what was right, that does not make him a criminal but rather “a fanatic”. Through this editorial, Greeley shows the ideologies of many Northerners who hoped that slaves would go free but knew it was not their place to invade the Southern states and free the slaves themselves. Being as this editorial was written the day after Brown was hanged for his leading of the raid at Harper’s Ferry, abolitionists are not yet united in their views of Brown, with some completely supporting him while others are not blind to the many flaws and immoral acts present in his plan. In this way, Greely makes it a point to address his fellow Northerners and spread the message that violence is not the way to help those that are being subjected to slavery. Unfortunately, it will be violence that will free the slaves in the end. (Document A) Greeley’s editorial shows how radical Brown was, especially when coupled with his time living in a freed-blacks community. This goes to show how strongly Brown felt about slavery and how he saw it as his mission to free the slaves himself. Abraham Lincoln, our Republican …show more content…
Both revolts contributed to the start of the Civil War as tensions concerning slavery began to rise and caused increasing opposition towards abolitionists and fear from southern states. Though many were opposed to the violence used in both rebellions, it is ultimately violence that wins the slaves a newfound

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