Antibiotic Resistance

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What are disease-causing bacteria and how harmful could they be? By their name, disease-causing bacteria are bacteria that cause disease. The effects that they have on the human body, or any living organism, can range from mild to severe. Fortunately, we have antibiotics to help prevent the spread of infection and protect our bodies against infectious bacterial diseases. Antibiotics, also called antimicrobial drugs, are drugs that fight off infectious disease caused by bacteria. With the intervention of antibiotics, we are able to treat, and even cure in some cases, disease caused by these harmful and fatal bacteria. Unfortunately, bacteria have become more and more resistant over the decades as more and more antibiotics are being manufactured …show more content…
However, some bodies can’t defend against those bacteria or other foreign agents. One of the most common mistakes made is that the body becomes resistant to certain antimicrobial drugs, but really is the bacteria that becomes resistant. Immunocompromised individuals are the most likely to be affected by a rise in antimicrobial resistance. Although antibiotic resistance is rising, there are many different ways that we can reduce the spread of it and to do so, everyone is involved. The easiest step everyone can take a part in to decrease antibiotic resistance is to always wash one’s hands and practice good hygiene, including disinfection and sterilization techniques. Also people should play their roles perspectively and use antibiotics properly. For example, doctors should only prescribe antibiotics when needed and after assessment of the patient and thorough monitoring of the antibiotic doses and its effects. And patients should take them carefully and exactly as prescribed and not take them if they don’t need them. When dealing with a sick and contagious patient, isolate the patient to a special are in the hospital so that the healthy persons don’t also get infected and wear protective garment when dealing with the patient. Also the public (including government, health care professionals, business leaders, the people, etc.) should communicate and …show more content…
Although there are different viewpoints on the issue of genetically modified foods, it is safe to say that is there are both risky and beneficial effects to genetically modified foods. Some of the benefits include plants building a resistance to drought and infestations. Also they could be more nutritional because important vitamins and minerals could be added to them. As a plus, the overall quality could be better because flavors can be enhanced. On the other hand, the risks of genetically modified foods include the environmental damage they cause because they are not grown in their natural habitat and they do not interbreed how they naturally would. They could also propose health gangers, such as allergies, because they the foods are altered and their natural benefits will not have an effect. With the risk of initiating a health concern, producers will than need to find a cure or treatment. This issue continues to be in debate and discussion and both sides are still supporting their

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