Essay On European Renaissance

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There comes a time when people put the pathway of religion on hold and open the door for a new era, an era of creativity and change. That era defines the European Renaissance. From its beginning and purpose, to the taking place of literature, and the great people and legacy it left behind, is the reason the european Renaissance was a time of great change. The European Renaissance was about the change from all about religion to focusing on other values and things. “The Renaissance was a time great social and cultural change in Europe. It was a period characterized by innovation, imagination, and creativity.” (Skwirk/ Red Apple Education Ltd.). The European Renaissances purpose was to look more at man within the lines of religion. “Art came …show more content…
“Elizabeth I (September 7, 1533 – March 24, 1603) was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from November 17, 1558, until her death. Sometimes referred to as The Virgin Queen (since she never married),...Elizabeth I was the fifth and final monarch of the Tudor dynasty, having succeeded her half-sister, Mary I. She steadied England during a period of political and religious turmoil and set her nation's course to become the leading Protestant world power for the next three centuries...Elizabeth was a short-tempered and sometimes indecisive ruler...Like her father, she was a writer and poet.” (New World Encyclopedia). Queen Elizabeth was the Queen of England and Ireland. She was the third and final child of Henry VIII. She took the throne after the death of her half-sister, Mary I. Her great rule over England made it become the leading Protestant world power for three centuries. She shared similar qualities as her father, Henry VIII. The European Renaissance legacy it left behind was a time of change. “ But in assessing the impact of the Renaissance equal importance has to be given to the way it interacted with other major cultural changes. The textual scrutiny applied by Renaissance humanists to ancient texts had revolutionary long-term significance when combined with the demands for religious reform that culminated in the Reformation. Married with

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