Anglo-Saxon Culture

1416 Words 6 Pages
They did all seek to build new societies free of the persecutions of the past, but most of them were predominately of Anglo-Saxon origin in their ethnic makeup. The nations that "founded" America would end up justifying their killing of the aboriginal people as a means of saying "well God ordained it". From this, even though America claims to not be based on ethnicity it ends up being a founding value of the United States and we possess a de facto founding ethnicity from the start. This founding ethnic culture remained the basis of American culture for a long period of time, it would then later be compelled only by the oncoming immigration of newer French, German, and Dutch communities to then become a kind of generalized northern European …show more content…
This is not surprising given that the Anglo-Saxon founded early American colonies. This latter view finds proponents all the way from the Ku Klux Klan that wants to keep America “white” to the argued theses of Samuel Huntington in which proclaims that the vital necessity of retaining the essentials of our English inherited founding political culture system essential to the sound functioning of the United States. Indeed, some American Nativists still interpret Northern Europe as being the true "white" in the United States. In fact is it misleading to think of either of these views as absolutes totally opposite of each other? Both are views at opposite ends of a long line along which all countries lie in their various mixtures of component identities and sense of national identity. Can we be patriotic without having ethnicity? Yes, in principle, as long as foreign conflicts do not directly correlate upon any one group within the country such as with Muslims religiously “linked” to 9/11or the Germans or Japanese during World War …show more content…
History can be seen as the search for a group 's identity as it changes over time. Over the course of history, we have witnessed a progression of loyalties from the family, to the clan, to the tribe, to the region, towards a religious unit, and finally emerging into a formal multiethnic formation of some kind. The common bonds within any unit at any time must be strong enough to forge a consensus of action within the group and to create the notion of being able to fight together as one. The more diverse that the group is the more complex the task of forging such a meaningful and sustainable common bonds can be. Bonds that have not been developed on their own and are not found in established will not withstand a confrontation with an outside force. This is a key concern for many about the long term sustainability of multicultural societies. Nationalism has been the main organizing sociopolitical concept in the West, which has led to the West having many powerful modern states. The concept of nationalism has very slowly spread across the globe, but it has not always been readily transplanted. The quickly built new “national” states outside of the European continent were often dominated by a single clan or religious sect who takes away the genuine “national "cohesion. This is why identity politics becomes such an important issue,

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