Analyzing Erikson's Stages Of Psychosocial Development

Good Essays
Theorist Essay Erik Erikson is the theorist behind the Stages of Psychosocial Development. Like Freud, Erikson takes a look at the development of the emotional like and psychological traits, however Erikson also looks at the development of self-identity. Erikson had his own share of identity problems but still managed to create a personally meaningful life. One of Erikson’s key components in his theory of development would be his eight stages. He took Freud’s five stages and extended them to eight, rather than going after parts of the body that lead to fixations, Erikson focused on age groups and the life-crisis’ they face during that time. His theory is that at each stage in life you face a life-crisis and how you develop after that stage …show more content…
When I was three years old I began becoming very fussy when it came to getting dressed and brushing my hair. I would squirm and tell my mom “no” and if she put my hair up I would take it down. My mom got fed up and eventually let me do it all myself. This I believe is a good example of the Autonomy Versus Shame. I was not shamed for this instead I was given the independence that my three year old self was demanding. I soon after began planning my outfits the night before showing initiative, my mother loved this as she didn’t have to worry about it so I did not feel guilt for my initiative, thus learning that planning and following through with my plans was a positive thing. This led to me being confident to make my own decision in my early adulthood and also ties into the idea that it is more important to look at humans making choices rather than being driven my …show more content…
They both look at child development have to do with the environment in which they are places. The Ecological Perspective looks more at where they live, whereas Erikson’s Theory looks more at situations they are placed it (crises). One of the strongest comparisons is that the Ecological Perspective really looks at the interaction between parent and child. With Erikson’s theory between the ages of zero - twelve much of the interaction is between child and parent. The parents have lots of influence in which choice the child makes when faced with their

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Erikson's first few psychosocial stages are slightly similar to that of Freud's stages one to three. Erikson also expands his developmental stages to eight. The main similarity with two theories is that the id, ego and super ego play important roles in the developmental stages. Adolescence & Learning, Assignment – 01 2015 4 MOHAMED SHIFAAU, ID: 5789 However, there are several differences that exist between the theories even with the names of the stages. Freud's psychosexual theory emphasizes the importance of basic needs and biological forces, while Erikson's psychosocial theory is based upon social and environmental…

    • 1013 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Erikson’s theory of psychological development has eight stages of psychosocial development. There are five stages from birth to an individual turns eighteen years of age and then three stages from eighteen years of age to an individual passes away. His theory states that in order to the ego to develop it must successfully resolves crises in every stage. The stages of the psychosocial theory are: Trust vs. Mistrust, Autonomy vs. Shame and Doubt, Initiative vs. Guilt, Industry (competence) vs. Inferiority, Identity vs. Role Confusion, Intimacy vs.…

    • 894 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    However, there are several differences that exist between the name of the stages and the developmental process that occur at each stage. This is due to each psychologist having a different view on factors that contribute to personality development. Freud’s psychoanalytical theory of personality emphasizes more on the role of the unconscious mind in determining personality, while Erikson believed that personality develops through the influence of conscious social factors. Nevertheless, both psychologist value the importance and influence of the unconscious mind on personality…

    • 1527 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Eight Stages Of Life

    • 1729 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Also, she has things to look forward to in the future such as continuing to watch her grandchildren grow up. I know she is also satisfied with her life because she said she would rather live during her lifetime, rather than the time teens today grow up in. She says the pace of life was a lot different during her lifetime and teenagers do a lot more today, especially with activities. Overall, my grandma is very happy and has accomplished what Erik Erikson has described as her…

    • 1729 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Erik Erikson, developmental psychologists proposed in his theory of “Stages of psychosocial development”, that over the life-span an individuals pscyhological development takes place in eight stages and is influenced by internal and external factors such as physical limitations, environment, culture and social experiences. Within each stage psychological crises arise and the success or failure of their resolution builds on past experiences as the individual’s progresses through to the next stage (Erickson, 1982). For example, to successfully proceed through “Stage 6 - Young Adults 18-40years” the individual must have developed a sense of personal identity and life purpose gained from the successful resolution of the “identity vs. role confusion”…

    • 1634 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    “He is considered the Father of Psychoanalysis and is largely credited with establishing the field of verbal psychotherapy. Originally trained as a neurologist, Freud is best known for his theories of the unconscious mind, dreams, infantile sexuality, libido, repression, and transference—all of which continue to influence the field of psychology to varying degrees” (Psychology Today). He emphasized that sex, dreams and culture helped to shape one's development. He defined his psychosexual development in five…

    • 1480 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    These theories explained why the predictions of each subject matter came to be recognized. To examine the psychoanalytic theory of Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, and Alfred Adler, these theories give a more thorough examination of the subject matter. Adler believed that individuals past influence the choices an individual makes in everyday life, where Freud believed in sexual tension was an essential human drive. Alder thought individuals were driven by his or her relationships with others. Both Freud and Alder agreed that an individual personality were developed within the first six years of life.…

    • 1258 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    According to Erikson’s theory, all individuals must go through the eight interrelated stages over the entire life cycle. Like Freud, Erikson was interested on how personality and behavior is influenced after birth. He emphasized the role of culture and society and the conflicts that can take place within the ego. Erickson focuses on the adaptive and creative characteristic of the ego and expanding the notion of the stages of personality development. Erikson claims that a successful transition from previous stages results in a healthy character.…

    • 1057 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    2. Neo Freudian theories These theories are the basically the works of other psychologists who agreed with the basis of Freud’s psychoanalytic theory but changed and adapted the theory to incorporate their own ideas, beliefs and theories. Some of the major neo-Freudian psychologists include Carl Jung, Alfred Adler, Erik Erikson, Karen Homey and Erich Fromm. There are a number of points of disagreement between the Neo-Freudian thinkers and Freud. Some of the points of disagreement are: • According to Erik Erikson, Freud was incorrect to suggest that personality is entirely shaped by childhood events.…

    • 952 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Evolutionary/Sociobiological perspective is based upon the notion that our biological evolution and adaptation influence in our everyday lifestyles. This theoretical perspective has been majorly influenced by John Bowlby’s evolutionary theory of attachment, this suggests that children come into the world biologically pre-programmed to form attachments with others, because this will help them to survive. The Ecological Systems Theory, influenced by UrieBronfenbrenner, explains development through reciprocal interactions between children and the settings in which they live. The fifth theoretical perspectives are the Contextual perspective. Contextual perspective describes the learning process and studying between two individuals or organisms(Hurst, 2003).This stage adolescents are between the ages 12 to 18 years old.…

    • 1331 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays