Essay On Edna's Childbirth Scene In The Awakening

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Chopin uses the childbirth scene as an impetus for Edna’s defiance that has been building throughout the novel against the injustice in women’s role in society. During Adele’s childbirth scene, Chopin uses terms that depict woman’s role in society as isolated and powerless that prompt Edna’s defiance against such injustices. Edna’s thoughts during Adele’s childbirth scene reveal her building insurgence towards her role as a mother, and as a woman. As Edna reflects on her own experience with childbirth, Chopin uses targeted diction that depicts Edna’s feeling of distance with words such as “far away,” “unreal,” and “half remembered.” (169) By describing the experience of childbirth as distant, Chopin is highlighting the isolation of womanhood. …show more content…
Adele’s discomfort throughout the childbirth scene is depicted through diction that clearly relays the injustice of the burden on women. Chopin uses words to describe the scene such as “agonizing,” “torture,” and “exhaust[ing].” Such negative words reveal the great burden that nature has placed upon women. Upon recognizing this injustice, Edna’s dissent grows and leads to her defiance against her identity as a woman. Chopin also presents the injustices towards women through Adele’s overwhelmed exclamations of panic.While Edna sits and observes, Adele says things such as “there is no use” and “This is too much!” (168). The extremity of Adele’s words represent the level of her frustration. Adele’s outbursts not only convey her discomfort, but the overwhelming panic which she is experiencing. Edna shares this frustration as she considers the great injustices that afflict women. Throughout Adele’s childbirth scene, as Edna observes Adele’s discomfort and pain, Edna’s objections grow as she realizes the injustices towards women, triggering her ultimate act of defiance at the end of the

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