Essay On Confucianism In China

2599 Words 11 Pages
Definition and History of Islam and Uighurs in China Despite how the current government may treat religion, religion has been a major driving force throughout China’s history. There is hardly a time when China wasn’t affected or influenced by religion, or peoples of a certain religious group. There are two major native religions in China that have played important roles not only cultural and socially, but within the shifting governments of the dynasties as well. The most major and influential is that of Confucianism. Confucianism is a philosophy that was founded by Kong Qiu, better known as Confucius. Confucianism expounded on order, harmony and the need for rituals and relationships for social harmony . It had an emphasis on what was …show more content…
It existed in the areas of Central Asia for some time. The peoples who have practiced Islam have fluctuated just as those who practiced other religions have. While it has mainly stayed on the outskirts of China, the Yuan Dynasty saw its official entrance into China’s history. Through Ming and the eruption within Qing, Islam is a religion that won’t be leaving any time soon from China’s doorstep. Additionally, Uighurs have had major relations with China’s shifting dynasties for centuries. Both Islamic and Uighur presences begin their first major basis of impact on China during the Tang Dynasty . During the fall of Sui, the general who would be emperor of Tang, Li Yuan, secured an alliance with the Khan of the Eastern Turks .This would be the beginning of formal relations between the Han and the peoples of Central Asia. This is also when territorial expansion into Central Asia would begin. They did this by stationing military garrisons along its frontier in hopes of defending itself from nomads. As a still rather fresh ruling power, it was within their best interest not to fight with any of the Central Asia peoples, especially the Turks. The Turkish Empire would eventually collapse, giving leeway for the Tang Dynasty to move further into Central Asia . The Uighurs would take over the area the Turks no longer controlled, as well. While not completely in control of the entire Xinjiang area, they had enough influence. This is also …show more content…
Muslims in China are allowed to have mosques, as markers of their communities. Most mosques had been destroyed during the Cultural Revolution, and was repaired in the 1980s by outside funding. But these mosques weren’t allowed to show anything that depicted that the Muslims within China had “outside” origins. While they may have superficially appeared to be as their Central Asian and Middle Eastern counterparts, they were missing key internal components. Muslims groups tend to remain rather divided. Islam is largely regulated by the government’s “Chinese Islamic Association”, and require that all mosques and madrassas be properly registered or be shut down otherwise .The 1980s saw a rise in Muslim groups putting emphasis on educating its people, ranging from young children to grown men and women, in Islamic texts and the Arabic language . Muslims also now enjoy being able to do hajj to Mecca and study abroad in Muslim dominated areas such as Malaysia, Central Asia or the Middle East . With it, however, has come issues, such as the spreading of radical Islamic thought that has spread within the groups in China’s

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