Essay On Canadian Identity

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Explain how you see the Canadian identity.
Although there are many interpretations of what one sees as a Canadian identity. I see Canada as a ‘cultural mosaic’; a multicultural country where different cultures and identities coexist peacefully. In other countries, assimilation is integrated as part of the immigration process, and even require the immigrant ‘to fit in’ with the culture. In contrast, Canada is a very fluid culture. Due to the history and the effect of ‘The Multiculturalism Act’, it reflects the Canada’s immigration policy. Although every citizen has to abide the law or practice civic nationalism, the government does not enforce homogeneity in the immigration and is able to accommodate many different cultural expressions. The epitome of Canada’s multiculturalism can be seen in everyday life. Television channels are broadcast in many languages, and there are many channels that cater to different ethnic audiences. When individuals are faced with contending loyalties, homogeneity, if it increases, is challenged Canada; allowing the root of multiculturalism and tolerance to grow deeper. Such is seen in the
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There are some aspects that is most important than others. Where different cultures and identities exist, civic responsibility not only plays a major role in harmony within society, but is also responsible for keeping the government in check, and ensuring citizens’ equality and rights are protected. In other words, if civic responsibility fails, multiculturalism will be at risk and the result is disastrous. Not only will there be an anarchy, culture and politics will breakdown as government holds too much power, constitution will be ignored and the remaining defining aspects of a nation will be shaped on what the government desires. Multiculturalism is essential to Canada and is only protected and ensured when its citizens practice civic

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