Canadian Confederation Case Study

Decent Essays
A. Question: To what extent was Canadian Confederation in 1867 the result of political, economic and social factors beyond the control of the British colonies of North America?
B. Thesis: Despite the success of the Great Coalition, and the need for a railway connecting the West and the East, being influential factors that led to Confederation, Canadian Confederation in 1867 most prominently came as a result of the Manifest Destiny ideology of the American people, and the termination of the Reciprocity Treaty, both factors beyond the control of the British colonies of North America.
C. Evidence:
POV #1: The success of the Great Coalition was a prominent political factor within the control of the British North American colonies, that had a
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Lawrence river froze over in the winter, stopping marine transportation
- the railway would also prevent Canada from being annexed, as it would create a border between the United States and Canada that would protect them
Source #4: Creighton, Donald Grant. The Road to Confederation: The Emergence of Canada, 1863-1867. Toronto: Macmillan, 1964. Print.
- creating a transcontinental railway would allow for increased settlement across the continent
- increased settlement to those areas would allow Canada to stake claim of the land, west of Canada West
- settlement to the west would provide Canada with a port at the Pacific Ocean which would greatly stimulate the economy
- unfortunately the construction of the railway could not be funded by any of the individual colonies
- Confederation would solve that issue as it would allow the federal government to pay for the construction using tax money
POV #3: Confederation in 1867 was mostly a result of external factors from the British colonies of North America, due to the widespread Manifest Destiny beliefs among the American people.
Source #5: "Manifest Destiny". Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online. Encyclopædia Britannica Inc., 2016. Web. 15 May.
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- Manifest Destiny was a widely held philosophy by the American people in the 19th century, who believed that they were destined to expand their territory and conquer British North America
- these beliefs posed a great threat to the safety and security of the British North American population, as they feared the possibility of annexation by the powerful American

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