Essay On Augustine Of Hippo

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Augustine of Hippo was an early Christian theologian and philosopher. He was born 13th of November 354 and died on the 28th of August 430. His writings significantly influenced Western Christianity and Western Philosophy. He was born the municipium of Thagaste, today known as Algeria, and considered himself African. His mother was a devout Christian, and his father was a Pagan who converted to Christianity on his deathbed. From a legal standpoint, his family were Romans. His family were honestiores, an upper class of citizens known as honorable men. It is believed that Augustine's first language was Latin. From an early age, Augustine became familiar with Latin Literature, attending a school in Madaurus. In his autobiography, he states that …show more content…
He wrote in detail about his conversion in his Confessions . In this, he talked about free will, the nature of time and other prominent philosophical topics. In 391, Augustine was named a priest in Hippo Regius, and went onto become a famous preacher. In 395, he was named coadjutor Bishop, and then became a full Bishop not long after. He worked hard, trying to convert the people of Hippo to convert to Christianity, and also defending Christianity against detractors.

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An example of Augustine’s impact on individuals is Possidius, bishop of Calama, and a good friend of Augustine. Possidius wrote about his admiration of Augustine’s powerful intellect and strong speech maker. He also wrote of Augustine’s ability to work hard, resist temptations, and study the Gospel in great detail.

His modern day impact can be seen in popular culture. He was portrayed in the 1972 television movie Augustine of Hippo. He was further portrayed by in the 2010 mini-series Augustine: The Decline of the Roman Empire and the 2012 feature film Restless Heart: The Confessions of Saint Augustine. He is also portrayed in music, most famously Bob Dylan’s song "I Dreamed I Saw St. Augustine" on his album John Wesley

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